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dc.contributor.authorNewton, Margaret Maryen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-14T16:51:08Z
dc.date.available2016-11-14T16:51:08Z
dc.date.issued1938
dc.date.submitted1938
dc.identifier.otherb14731484
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/19125
dc.descriptionThesis (Ed.M.)--Boston University N.B.: Misnomer no page 29en_US
dc.description.abstractNewman believes that knowledge is a whole and that the separate subject-matter fields are parts of the whole. He divides the pursuit of knowledge into three great fields, God, Nature, and Man. Newman defines a university as a place where universal knowledge is to be taught. Since he sees knowledge as a whole he sees the separate parts connected with each other.[TRUNCATED]en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.rightsBased on investigation of the BU Libraries' staff, this work is free of known copyright restrictions.en_US
dc.titleEducational ideas expressed by Thomas Arnold and Cardinal Newman. Comparison and contrasten_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameMaster of Educationen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineEducationen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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