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dc.contributor.authorNewton, Margaret Mary
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-14T16:51:08Z
dc.date.available2016-11-14T16:51:08Z
dc.date.issued1938
dc.date.submitted1938
dc.identifier.otherb14731484
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/19125
dc.descriptionThesis (Ed.M.)--Boston University N.B.: Misnomer no page 29
dc.description.abstractNewman believes that knowledge is a whole and that the separate subject-matter fields are parts of the whole. He divides the pursuit of knowledge into three great fields, God, Nature, and Man. Newman defines a university as a place where universal knowledge is to be taught. Since he sees knowledge as a whole he sees the separate parts connected with each other.[TRUNCATED]
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston University
dc.rightsBased on investigation of the BU Libraries' staff, this work is free of known copyright restrictions.
dc.titleEducational ideas expressed by Thomas Arnold and Cardinal Newman. Comparison and contrast
dc.typeThesis/Dissertation
etd.degree.nameMaster of Education
etd.degree.levelmasters
etd.degree.disciplineEducation
etd.degree.grantorBoston University


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