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dc.contributor.authorDoerr, Mark Andrewen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-18T19:53:57Z
dc.date.available2016-11-18T19:53:57Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/19207
dc.description.abstractSocial interest and recent advance in technology have made concussions on the largest topics is scientific research today. Knowledge continues to be uncovered and more data and information is studied on the effects of concussions and links to later in life cognitive decline. Dementia and Alzheimer’s disease have been known consequences of chronic traumatic encephalopathy but with recent findings in retired football players, more research is needed to show the correlation between concussions and the effects on cognition. Furthermore, with millions of youth athletes participating in sports each year, the impact of concussions on development and maturation need to be further researched. Initial retrospective studies seem to show the correlation between early in life concussions and decreased cognitive function later in life but longitudinal studies are lacking. Cognitive function data collected in longitudinal studies may help to show how early changes in function may be able to be identified and prevent further decline from repetitive impacts. Studies such as this would help fill the gap in research that could change youth sports as well as medical treatment and prevention to youth concussions.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectNeurosciencesen_US
dc.subjectConcussionsen_US
dc.subjectCTEen_US
dc.subjectFootballen_US
dc.subjectimpacten_US
dc.subjectCognitive functionsen_US
dc.titleCognitive effects associated with frequency and onset of sports related concussionsen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.date.updated2016-11-03T22:07:59Z
etd.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplinePhysician Assistant Programen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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