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dc.contributor.authorGrossberg, Stephenen_US
dc.contributor.authorYazdanbakhsh, Arashen_US
dc.contributor.authorCao, Yongqiangen_US
dc.contributor.authorSwaminathan, Guruen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-14T18:17:05Z
dc.date.available2011-11-14T18:17:05Z
dc.date.issued2007-07
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/1948
dc.description.abstractUnder natural viewing conditions, a single depthful percept of the world is consciously seen. When dissimilar images are presented to corresponding regions of the two eyes, binocular rivalyr may occur, during which the brain consciously perceives alternating percepts through time. How do the same brain mechanisms that generate a single depthful percept of the world also cause perceptual bistability, notably binocular rivalry? What properties of brain representations correspond to consciously seen percepts? A laminar cortical model of how cortical areas V1, V2, and V4 generate depthful percepts is developed to explain and quantitatively simulate binocualr rivalry data. The model proposes how mechanisms of cortical developement, perceptual grouping, and figure-ground perception lead to signle and rivalrous percepts. Quantitative model simulations include influences of contrast changes that are synchronized with switches in the dominant eye percept, gamma distribution of dominant phase durations, piecemeal percepts, and coexistence of eye-based and stimulus-based rivalry. The model also quantitatively explains data about multiple brain regions involved in rivalry, effects of object attention on switching between superimposed transparent surfaces, and monocular rivalry. These data explanations are linked to brain mechanisms that assure non-rivalrous conscious percepts. To our knowledge, no existing model can explain all of these phenomena.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundation (SBE-0354378, IIS-97-20333); Office of Naval Research (N00014-01-1-0624, N00014-95-1-0657, N00014-95-1-0409); Air Force Office of Scientific Research (F49620-01-1-0397, F49620-98-1-0108); Whitaker Foundation (RG-99-0186)en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston University Center for Adaptive Systems and Department of Cognitive and Neural Systemsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesBU CAS/CNS Technical Reports;CAS/CNS-TR-2007-010
dc.rightsCopyright 2007 Boston University. Permission to copy without fee all or part of this material is granted provided that: 1. The copies are not made or distributed for direct commercial advantage; 2. the report title, author, document number, and release date appear, and notice is given that copying is by permission of BOSTON UNIVERSITY TRUSTEES. To copy otherwise, or to republish, requires a fee and / or special permission.en_US
dc.subjectVisual cortexen_US
dc.subjectBinocular visionen_US
dc.subjectBinocular rivalryen_US
dc.subjectPerceptual groupingen_US
dc.subjectOrientational competitionen_US
dc.subjectSynaptic habituationen_US
dc.subjectSurface perceptionen_US
dc.subjectLAMINART modelen_US
dc.subjectConsciousnessen_US
dc.titleHow Does Binocular Rivalry Emerge from Cortical Mechanisms of 3D Vision?en_US
dc.typeTechnical Reporten_US
dc.rights.holderBoston University Trusteesen_US


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