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dc.contributor.authorStein, Peter Jonathanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-08T18:37:26Z
dc.date.available2016-12-08T18:37:26Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/19562
dc.description.abstractTo achieve expressive musical results in violin bowing, performers access wide ranges of combined musical tone loudness and duration variables. By comparison, allowable mechanical variability in bow stroke execution may be limited. Such constraints on string bowing variability similarly might limit variability of bowing limb movement. Constrained variability may carry risk of upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders. Therefore if musical and/or bowing-execution variables influence bowing limb movement variability, they may in turn influence risk of cumulative injury in the player. In two experimental studies we examined the influence of the musical variables of duration and sound intensity (loudness) on variability in both string bowing mechanical variables and bowing limb joint moments (i.e. rotational forces) and joint angle trajectories. Five violinists performed playing tasks in which bow strokes varied across four levels of duration and three levels of loudness. Given a constant-amplitude bow stroke, quiet, brief strokes and loud, long strokes had to be executed close to the lower and upper limits of permissible bow-on-string force (bow force). In Study #1, we computed one- and three-dimensional bow movement variance measures, in both kinematic (bow velocity across violin string, distance from bow-to-bridge) and kinetic (bow force) variables. In Study #2 we computed the cycle-to-cycle standard deviation of joint moments and angles for each moment and angular degree of freedom in the bowing limb. In each study, these variability measures were compared across the 12 experimental conditions. We hypothesized that variability would be lowest when executing quiet/brief and loud/long strokes, compared to strokes that could be executed further from bow force limits. However, it was also anticipated that variability instead could be influenced most strongly by bow and/or limb velocity, magnitude of bow force, and/or bowed-string loudness response properties. Results from both studies indicated that variability in both bow-on-string and limb movement was conditioned on these latter properties: tone duration and loudness exerted consistent effects on variances and standard deviations. Contradicting the main hypothesis, variability was not influenced by proximity to bow force limits. We conclude that bowing variability is constrained mainly by factors not specific to variability tolerance at the bow-violin string interface.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectKinesiologyen_US
dc.subjectMusculoskeletal diseasesen_US
dc.subjectMusiciansen_US
dc.subjectUpper extremityen_US
dc.subjectVariationen_US
dc.titleTask variables in violin bowing: influence on variability of bow and bowing limb movementen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.date.updated2016-11-07T20:07:04Z
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_US
etd.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
etd.degree.disciplineSargent College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciencesen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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