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dc.contributor.authorSlessinger, Seymouren_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-14T03:35:12Z
dc.date.available2016-12-14T03:35:12Z
dc.date.issued1961
dc.date.submitted1961
dc.identifier.otherb14692284
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/19666
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Boston University.en_US
dc.description.abstractAs one examines the historical record of Marxism on the national question, it becomes evident that Soviet Russian use of the national idea in foreign policy since 1918 has been a logical extension of ideas first advanced by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels in the nineteenth century. For one thing, it has been based on the classical Marxian assumption that the nation and nationalism possess no lasting value, that, as the products of capitalist economics, they will disappear with the advent of socialism on a world scale. For another thing, it has also been based on Marx's acceptance of the nation and nationalism as acts to be reckoned with as long as they do exist, and even to be promoted at such times when the paramount revolutionary interest will be served best. In this first chapter, attention will be centered on the character of the classical Marxian regard for the national question, its eclipse in socialist thinking after Marx's death, and its revival and remolding by Lenin to it the circumstances of the Russian revolution. [TRUNCATED]en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.rightsBased on investigation of the BU Libraries' staff, this work is free of known copyright restrictions.en_US
dc.subjectNationalismen_US
dc.titleThe idea of nationalism in Soviet foreign policyen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Governmenten_US
etd.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
etd.degree.disciplineGovernmenten_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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