Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorGrossberg, Stephenen_US
dc.contributor.authorVersace, Massimilianoen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-14T18:20:42Z
dc.date.available2011-11-14T18:20:42Z
dc.date.issued2006-12-06
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/2054
dc.description.abstractHow do our brains transform the "blooming buzzing confusion" of daily experience into a coherent sense of self that can learn and selectively attend to important information? How do local signals at multiple processing stages, none of which has a global view of brain dynamics or behavioral outcomes, trigger learning at multiple synaptic sites when appropriate, and prevent learning when inappropriate, to achieve useful behavioral goals in a continually changing world? How does the brain allow synaptic plasticity at a remarkably rapid rate, as anyone who has gone to an exciting movie is readily aware, yet also protect useful memories from catastrophic forgetting? A neural model provides a unified answer by explaining and quantitatively simulating data about single cell biophysics and neurophysiology, laminar neuroanatomy, aggregate cell recordings (current-source densities, local field potentials), large-scale oscillations (beta, gamma), and spike-timing dependent plasticity, and functionally linking them all to cognitive information processing requirements.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipAir Force Office of Scientific Research (F49620-01-1-0397); National Science Foundation (SBE-0354378); Office of Naval Research (N00014-01-1-0624)en_US
dc.publisherBoston University Center for Adaptive Systems and Department of Cognitive and Neural Systemsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesBU CAS/CNS Technical Reports;CAS/CNS-TR-2006-012
dc.rightsCopyright 2006 Boston University. Permission to copy without fee all or part of this material is granted provided that: 1. The copies are not made or distributed for direct commercial advantage; 2. the report title, author, document number, and release date appear, and notice is given that copying is by permission of BOSTON UNIVERSITY TRUSTEES. To copy otherwise, or to republish, requires a fee and / or special permission.en_US
dc.titleFrom Synapse to Self: Spikes, Synchrony, and Attentive Learning by Laminar Thalamocortical Circuitsen_US
dc.typeTechnical Reporten_US
dc.rights.holderBoston University Trusteesen_US


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record