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dc.contributor.authorFang, Liangen_US
dc.contributor.authorGrossberg, Stephenen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-14T18:20:42Z
dc.date.available2011-11-14T18:20:42Z
dc.date.issued2006-12-12
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/2055
dc.description.abstractWhen we look at a scene, how do we consciously see surfaces infused with lightness and color at the correct depths? Random Dot Stereograms (RDS) probe how binocular disparity between the two eyes can generate such conscious surface percepts. Dense RDS do so despite the fact that they include multiple false binocular matches. Sparse stereograms do so even across large contrast-free regions with no binocular matches. Stereograms that define occluding and occluded surfaces lead to surface percepts wherein partially occluded textured surfaces are completed behind occluding textured surfaces at a spatial scale much larger than that of the texture elements themselves. Earlier models suggest how the brain detects binocular disparity, but not how RDS generate conscious percepts of 3D surfaces. A neural model predicts how the layered circuits of visual cortex generate these 3D surface percepts using interactions between visual boundary and surface representations that obey complementary computational rules.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipAir Force Office of Scientific Research (F49620-01-1-0397); National Science Foundation (EIA-01-30851, SBE-0354378); Office of Naval Research (N00014-01-1-0624)en_US
dc.publisherBoston University Center for Adaptive Systems and Department of Cognitive and Neural Systemsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesBU CAS/CNS Technical Reports;CAS/CNS-TR-2006-013
dc.rightsCopyright 2006 Boston University. Permission to copy without fee all or part of this material is granted provided that: 1. The copies are not made or distributed for direct commercial advantage; 2. the report title, author, document number, and release date appear, and notice is given that copying is by permission of BOSTON UNIVERSITY TRUSTEES. To copy otherwise, or to republish, requires a fee and / or special permission.en_US
dc.titleFrom Stereogram to Surface: How the Brain Sees the World in Depthen_US
dc.typeTechnical Reporten_US
dc.rights.holderBoston University Trusteesen_US


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