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dc.contributor.authorGrossberg, Stephenen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-14T18:24:30Z
dc.date.available2011-11-14T18:24:30Z
dc.date.issued1992-10
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/2100
dc.description.abstractA neural network model of 3-D visual perception and figure-ground separation by visual cortex is introduced. The theory provides a unified explanation of how a 2-D image may generate a 3-D percept; how figures pop-out from cluttered backgrounds; how spatially sparse disparity cues can generate continuous surface representations at different perceived depths; how representations of occluded regions can be completed and recognized without usually being seen; how occluded regions can sometimes be seen during percepts of transparency; how high spatial frequency parts of an image may appear closer than low spatial frequency parts; how sharp targets are detected better against a figure and blurred targets are detector better against a background; how low spatial frequency parts of an image may be fused while high spatial frequency parts are rivalrous; how sparse blue cones can generate vivid blue surface percepts; how 3-D neon color spreading, visual phantoms, and tissue contrast percepts are generated; how conjunctions of color-and-depth may rapidly pop-out during visual search. These explanations arise derived from an ecological analysis of how monocularly viewed parts of an image inherit the appropriate depth from contiguous binocularly viewed parts, as during DaVinci stereopsis. The model predicts the functional role and ordering of multiple interactions within and between the two parvocellular processing streams that join LGN to prestriate area V4. Interactions from cells representing larger scales and disparities to cells representing smaller scales and disparities are of particular importance.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipAir Force Office of Scientific Research (90-0175); Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (90-0083); Office of Naval Research (N00014-92-J-4015, N00014-91-J-4100)en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston University Center for Adaptive Systems and Department of Cognitive and Neural Systemsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesBU CAS/CNS Technical Reports;CAS/CNS-TR-1992-020
dc.rightsCopyright 1992 Boston University. Permission to copy without fee all or part of this material is granted provided that: 1. The copies are not made or distributed for direct commercial advantage; 2. the report title, author, document number, and release date appear, and notice is given that copying is by permission of BOSTON UNIVERSITY TRUSTEES. To copy otherwise, or to republish, requires a fee and / or special permission.en_US
dc.subjectVisionen_US
dc.subjectNeural networksen_US
dc.subjectVisual cortexen_US
dc.subjectFigure-ground separationen_US
dc.subjectSegmentationen_US
dc.subjectStereopsisen_US
dc.subjectSurface perceptionen_US
dc.subjectFilling-inen_US
dc.subjectSpatial frequency analysisen_US
dc.subjectColor perceptionen_US
dc.titleA Solution of the Figure-ground Problem for Biological Visionen_US
dc.typeTechnical Reporten_US
dc.rights.holderBoston University Trusteesen_US


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