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dc.contributor.authorCalderwood, Audrey Hongen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-12T20:21:08Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.date.submitted2014
dc.identifier.other
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/21128
dc.descriptionThesis (M.S.H.P.) PLEASE NOTE: Boston University Libraries did not receive an Authorization To Manage form for this thesis or dissertation. It is therefore not openly accessible, though it may be available by request. If you are the author or principal advisor of this work and would like to request open access for it, please contact us at open-help@bu.edu. Thank you.en_US
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Effective colorectal cancer prevention programs should ensure that patients with adenomas receive timely surveillance colonoscopy consistent with guidelines. The aim of our study was to identify patient-, provider-, and system-level predictors of adherence with surveillance colonoscopy in an ethnically diverse safety-net population. METHODS: We performed a retrospective analysis of average-risk patients age 50-75 with adenomas diagnosed at screening colonoscopy at Boston Medical Center and its affiliated community health centers from 1/1/2005 to 12/31/2007. The primary outcome was on-time follow-up defined as attendance at surveillance colonoscopy within 5.5 years of the screening colonoscopy. We compared frequencies of on-time follow-up and performed multivariable analysis, including ethnicity/language and any variable with P value <0.20 in unadjusted analysis. RESULTS: We identified 891 patients, of which 38% were English-speaking Non-Hispanic blacks, 24% Non-Hispanic white, and 10% Spanish-speaking Hispanics. Overall, 38.2% attended on-time surveillance colonoscopy. In unadjusted analyses, having ≥3 PCP visits in year 3-5 after baseline colonoscopy (OR 3.6 [2.6-5.1]), having “adenoma” on the electronic medical record problem list (OR 2.2 [1.6-2.9]), age (OR 0.98 [0.96-1.0]), and Charlson Index ≥1 (OR 1.3 [1.0-1.8]) were positively associated with adherence. In multivariate analysis, having “adenoma” on the problem list remained significant (adjusted OR (aOR) 1.8 [1.3-2.5]). Significant interactions were observed for ethnicity/language and PCP visits (P=0.008). CONCLUSION: A substantial proportion of adenoma-bearing patients fail to attend surveillance colonoscopy even in a safety net setting. Adding “adenomas” to the EMR problem list improved attendance, suggesting that system-level interventions may increase adherence to surveillance colonoscopy.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.subjectHealth policyen_US
dc.subjectPublic healthen_US
dc.subjectColorectal cancer preventionen_US
dc.titlePredictors of adherence to post-polypectomy surveillance colonoscopyen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.description.embargo2031-01-01
etd.degree.nameMaster of Science in Health Policyen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineHealth Policyen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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