Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorGrant, Michael A.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-12T20:32:45Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.date.submitted2013
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/21160
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.) PLEASE NOTE: Boston University Libraries did not receive an Authorization To Manage form for this thesis or dissertation. It is therefore not openly accessible, though it may be available by request. If you are the author or principal advisor of this work and would like to request open access for it, please contact us at open-help@bu.edu. Thank you.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe brain-machine interface (BMI) is an exciting new class of device in the field of biomedical engineering that shows great promise for the rehabilitation of persons with paralysis by recording neural signals and translating them into movement of objects such as prosthetics and computer cursors. This study aims to present a brief history of the devices including the three main methods of recording neural signals as well as some of the functions possible with BMIs and their basic design. It will also provide insight into some of the technical challenges currently preventing BMIs from widespread use for rehabilitative therapy including, but not limited to, signal degradation and a lack of design consensus. This study will also give examples of exciting new methods that are being considered for integration into the BMI world such as functional electrical stimulation and optogenetics as well as providing some examples of currently available commercial BMIs that are on the market. The study will conclude with a discussion of what needs to be done in order for BMIs to eventually enable paralyzed persons to live independently. A hypothetical scenario is depicted that highlights some of the factors that will need to be considered in order to allow a paralyzed person to fully rely on their BMI. Finally, a discussion of the ethical implications of BMIs are presented including how BMIs should be implemented with children as there is currently no research on that subject. Pediatric adoption of cochlear implants is used as an example of a similar technology that has already been widely accepted for public use despite lingering ethical concerns.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.subjectMedicineen_US
dc.subjectBiomedical engineeringen_US
dc.subjectBrain-machine interfacesen_US
dc.subjectDisabilityen_US
dc.titleBrain-machine interfaces: moving towards independent living for the severely disableden_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.description.embargo2031-01-01
etd.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineMedicineen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record