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dc.contributor.authorLentini, Timen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-13T01:49:46Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.date.submitted2013
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/21204
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.) PLEASE NOTE: Boston University Libraries did not receive an Authorization To Manage form for this thesis or dissertation. It is therefore not openly accessible, though it may be available by request. If you are the author or principal advisor of this work and would like to request open access for it, please contact us at open-help@bu.edu. Thank you.en_US
dc.description.abstractInflammatory myeloid dendritic cells (DCs) are critical in the pathogenesis and maintenance of psoriasis vulgaris, a chronic inflammatory skin disease of unknown etiology. New ways to define these cells, and their precursors, may allow us to better understand their role in inflammation. Immunohistochemistry was performed on frozen tissue sections of normal and psoriasis biopsies to examine the dermal expression of potential markers of inflammatory DCs, namely CLEC9A, CD103, SlanDC, and TREM-1. The allostimulatory capacity of DC subsets (of SlanDC+ and CD1c+) was compared in a mixed leukocyte assay (MLR). Potential precursors of inflammatory DCs were FACS-sorted for transcriptomic profiling and functional assays. CLEC9A, CD103, and SlanDC did not prove useful in uniquely identifying myeloid dendritic cells in normal skin, and inflammatory dendritic cells in inflammation. TREM-1 was highly upregulated in psoriasis lesional skin as compared to non-lesional, and its activation may be critical in the maintenance of inflammation. Contrary to published findings, CD1c+ DCs possessed a higher allo-stimulatory capacity than SlanDCs, and induced greater IL-17 in T cells. TREM-1 may provide a novel therapeutic target for psoriasis treatment. The six circulating monocyte and dendritic cell populations in human peripheral blood were obtained via FACS sorting, and their genomic profiles will be examined. By comparing the genomic profiles of the six circulating monocyte and dendritic cell populations in human blood, and examining their allo- and autostimulatory capacities in a peptidoglycan (PGN) stimulated in vitro model of inflammation, the source of these inflammatory dendritic cells can be identified, and provide future targets of therapy for this psoriasis.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.subjectMedicineen_US
dc.subjectDendritic cellsen_US
dc.subjectPsoriasis vulgarisen_US
dc.titleMonocytes and dendritic cells in human peripheral blooden_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.description.embargo2031-01-01
etd.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineMedicineen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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