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dc.contributor.authorMurray, Brett Richarden_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-13T01:52:21Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.date.submitted2013
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/21225
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.) PLEASE NOTE: Boston University Libraries did not receive an Authorization To Manage form for this thesis or dissertation. It is therefore not openly accessible, though it may be available by request. If you are the author or principal advisor of this work and would like to request open access for it, please contact us at open-help@bu.edu. Thank you.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe use of emergency lights and sirens as warning devices by ambulances is a hotly debated topic within the Emergency Medical Services. For the last few decades, research has shown that lights and sirens have only a minimal effect on time required to transport patients to the hospital, and essentially no positive effect on patient outcome. Meanwhile, thousands of ambulance crashes occur every year (usually during the operation of lights and sirens), and its possible that's tens of thousands of crashes are occurring as a result of a passing ambulance, though not directly involving the ambulance itself. This paper is meant to provide a thorough review of the science behind the use of lights and sirens, the risks they pose to EMS providers, patients, and the public, and strategies to help curb the cost they pose both in dollars and lives. The available literature on this subject all points to the use of lights and sirens being out dated, ineffective, and dangerous, and yet almost nothing has been done to solve the problems they cause. Continued research and development is needed to help make ambulances safer for their occupants, more effective driver training programs need to be offered to EMS providers, and protocols need to be adopted to limit the unnecessary use of L&S.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.rightsThis work is being made available in OpenBU by permission of its author, and is available for research purposes only. All rights are reserved to the author.en_US
dc.subjectMedicineen_US
dc.subjectAmbulancesen_US
dc.subjectPublic safetyen_US
dc.titleThe use of emergency lights and sirens by ambulances and their effect on patient outcome and public safetyen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.description.embargo2031-01-01
etd.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineMedicineen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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