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dc.contributor.authorSato, Kaori D.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-13T01:55:59Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.date.submitted2013
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/21249
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.) PLEASE NOTE: Boston University Libraries did not receive an Authorization To Manage form for this thesis or dissertation. It is therefore not openly accessible, though it may be available by request. If you are the author or principal advisor of this work and would like to request open access for it, please contact us at open-help@bu.edu. Thank you.en_US
dc.description.abstractRecent studies have shown the efficacy and practicality of the integration of complementary and alternative therapies and biomedical treatments for various diseases and illnesses, including high blood pressure, diabetes, epilepsy, and cancer. Saper et al. (2013) demonstrated that once-weekly yoga classes were equally as effective for relieving chronic low back pain in low-income, minority populations than twice-weekly yoga classes. Pain medication data collected from this 12-week study was used to examine the effect of yoga on analgesic use. Pain medications were categorized into four major groups: (1) acetaminophen, (2) opiates, (3) non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS), and (4) other. The average number of NSAID pills taken daily decreased from baseline to 12 weeks. In addition, there was no statistically significant difference in the average number of any type of analgesic taken between once- and twice-weekly yoga groups from baseline to 12 weeks. Our findings suggest that yoga is most useful for individuals with mild to moderate chronic low back pain; however, further studies with more powerful sample sizes must be conducted in order to make more precise conclusions.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.subjectMedicineen_US
dc.subjectChronic pain treatmenten_US
dc.subjectYogaen_US
dc.titlePain medication use by participants in a yoga study for chronic low back painen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.description.embargo2031-01-01
etd.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineMedicineen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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