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dc.contributor.authorStolzoff, Michelle L.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-13T01:56:05Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.date.submitted2013
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/21256
dc.descriptionThesis (M.Sc.Eng.) PLEASE NOTE: Boston University Libraries did not receive an Authorization To Manage form for this thesis or dissertation. It is therefore not openly accessible, though it may be available by request. If you are the author or principal advisor of this work and would like to request open access for it, please contact us at open-help@bu.edu. Thank you.en_US
dc.description.abstractNanoparticle-based drug delivery has been explored to circumvent the often-toxic chemotherapy treatments used today by providing a more efficient and specific delivery to diseased tissues. Recently we have developed polymeric pH-responsive expansile nanoparticles (eNPs) for intracellular delivery of paclitaxel (Pax) as an improvement upon the traditional methods of delivery of Pax with using Cremophor/ethanol. As eNPs are internalized by the cell, the hydrophobic protecting groups found on side chains along the polymer backbone are hydrolyzed, leaving behind hydrophilic moieties that cause the eNPs to slowly swell with water. In this manner, the encapsulation and controlled release of a hydrophobic drug can be achieved. By altering the surface characteristics of the eNPs, one can change the behavior of the delivery vehicle as well as the biological response. To explore this approach, two surfactant strategies were employed. Specifically, the original sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactant has been substituted with PEGylated surfactants (either lipids or poloxamer) to improve circulation and in vivo stability. In addition, these surfactants were functionalized to target the folate receptor (FR), which is overexpressed in several cancers, in order to increase cancer cell-specific localization and uptake. The resulting eNPs retained their swelling characteristics while demonstrating improved cellular uptake in folate receptor-expressing KB and MDA-MB-231 carcinoma cells with no change in uptake in A549 cells, which do not express the folate receptor.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.subjectBiomedical engineeringen_US
dc.subjectChemotherapyen_US
dc.subjectNanoparticle-based drug deliveryen_US
dc.subjectCancer treatmenten_US
dc.titleDesigning the surface properties of expansile nanoparticles for targeted cancer therapyen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.description.embargo2031-01-01
etd.degree.nameMaster of Science in Engineeringen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineBiomedical Engineeringen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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