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dc.contributor.authorMartinet, Louis-Emmanuelen_US
dc.contributor.authorFiddyment, Granten_US
dc.contributor.authorMadsen, J.R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorEskandar, E.N.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTruccolo, Wilsonen_US
dc.contributor.authorEden, Uri T.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCash, S.S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKramer, Mark A.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialEnglanden_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-19T01:07:40Z
dc.date.available2017-04-19T01:07:40Z
dc.date.issued2017-04-04
dc.identifierhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28374740
dc.identifier.citationMartinet, L. E. et al. Human seizures couple across spatial scales through travelling wave dynamics. Nat. Commun. 8, 14896 doi: 10.1038/ncomms14896 (2017).
dc.identifier.issn2041-1723
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/21311
dc.description.abstractEpilepsy-the propensity toward recurrent, unprovoked seizures-is a devastating disease affecting 65 million people worldwide. Understanding and treating this disease remains a challenge, as seizures manifest through mechanisms and features that span spatial and temporal scales. Here we address this challenge through the analysis and modelling of human brain voltage activity recorded simultaneously across microscopic and macroscopic spatial scales. We show that during seizure large-scale neural populations spanning centimetres of cortex coordinate with small neural groups spanning cortical columns, and provide evidence that rapidly propagating waves of activity underlie this increased inter-scale coupling. We develop a corresponding computational model to propose specific mechanisms-namely, the effects of an increased extracellular potassium concentration diffusing in space-that support the observed spatiotemporal dynamics. Understanding the multi-scale, spatiotemporal dynamics of human seizures-and connecting these dynamics to specific biological mechanisms-promises new insights to treat this devastating disease.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipM.A.K., L.-E.M., U.T.E. and S.S.C. were supported by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Award R01NS072023. M.A.K. was supported by the National Science Foundation Division of Mathematical Sciences Award Number 1451384. G.F. was supported by a Pre-Doctoral Training Grant from the Epilepsy Foundation Award #330118. W.T. was supported by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Award R01NS079533; the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, Merit Review Award I01RX000668; and the Pablo J. Salame ‘88 Goldman Sachs endowed Assistant Professorship of Computational Neuroscience.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://rdcu.be/qBRh
dc.format.extent14896 - ?en_US
dc.languageeng
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation.ispartofNat Commun
dc.relation.ispartofseriesNature Communications;
dc.rightsAttribution 3.0en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
dc.subjectApplied mathematicsen_US
dc.subjectEpilepsyen_US
dc.subjectSeizuresen_US
dc.titleHuman seizures couple across spatial scales through travelling wave dynamicsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionPublished versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/ncomms14896
pubs.elements-sourcepubmeden_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: No embargoen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Mathematics & Statisticsen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublished onlineen_US


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