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dc.contributor.authorDorman, Clarken_US
dc.contributor.authorGaudiano, Paoloen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-14T18:46:35Z
dc.date.available2011-11-14T18:46:35Z
dc.date.issued1994-07
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/2158
dc.description.abstractThe ability of humans and animals to survive in a constantly changing environment is a testament to the power of biological processes. At any given instant in our lives, we are faced with an enormous number of sensory stimuli, and we can typically generate an equally large number of behaviors. How do we learn to ignore irrelevant information and suppress inappropriate behavior so that we may function in a complex environment? In this chapter we discuss motivation, the internal force that produces actions reflecting the interactions between our needs and the demands of our environment. We will first discuss what psychologists mean when they refer to motivation, and then review neural network theories that can expbin how motivation arises within biological nervous systems.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipSloan Fellowship (BR-3122): Air Force Office of Scientific Research (F49620-92-J-0499, F49620-92-J-0334)en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston University Center for Adaptive Systems and Department of Cognitive and Neural Systemsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesBU CAS/CNS Technical Reports;CAS/CNS-TR-1994-020
dc.rightsCopyright 1994 Boston University. Permission to copy without fee all or part of this material is granted provided that: 1. The copies are not made or distributed for direct commercial advantage; 2. the report title, author, document number, and release date appear, and notice is given that copying is by permission of BOSTON UNIVERSITY TRUSTEES. To copy otherwise, or to republish, requires a fee and / or special permission.en_US
dc.titleMotivationen_US
dc.typeTechnical Reporten_US
dc.rights.holderBoston University Trusteesen_US


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