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dc.contributor.authorDurkin, Maureen S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorElsabbagh, Mayadaen_US
dc.contributor.authorBarbaro, Josephineen_US
dc.contributor.authorGladstone, Melissaen_US
dc.contributor.authorHappe, Francescaen_US
dc.contributor.authorHoekstra, Rosa A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, Li-Chingen_US
dc.contributor.authorRattazzi, Alexiaen_US
dc.contributor.authorStapel-Wax, Jenniferen_US
dc.contributor.authorStone, Wendy L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTager-Flusberg, Helenen_US
dc.contributor.authorThurm, Audreyen_US
dc.contributor.authorTomlinson, Marken_US
dc.contributor.authorShih, Andyen_US
dc.coverage.spatialUnited Statesen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-22T19:53:39Z
dc.date.available2017-04-22T19:53:39Z
dc.date.issued2015-10
dc.identifierhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26437907
dc.identifier.citationMaureen S Durkin, Mayada Elsabbagh, Josephine Barbaro, Melissa Gladstone, Francesca Happe, Rosa A Hoekstra, Li-Ching Lee, Alexia Rattazzi, Jennifer Stapel-Wax, Wendy L Stone, Helen Tager-Flusberg, Audrey Thurm, Mark Tomlinson, Andy Shih. 2015. "Autism screening and diagnosis in low resource settings: Challenges and opportunities to enhance research and services worldwide.." Autism Res, Volume 8, Issue 5, pp. 473 - 476.
dc.identifier.issn1939-3806
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/21710
dc.description.abstractMost research into the epidemiology, etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis and treatment of autism is based on studies in high income countries. Moreover, within high income countries, individuals of high socioeconomic status are disproportionately represented among participants in autism research. Corresponding disparities in access to autism screening, diagnosis, and treatment exist globally. One of the barriers perpetuating this imbalance is the high cost of proprietary tools for diagnosing autism and for delivering evidence-based therapies. Another barrier is the high cost of training of professionals and para-professionals to use the tools. Open-source and open access models provide a way to facilitate global collaboration and training. Using these models and technologies, the autism scientific community and clinicians worldwide should be able to work more effectively and efficiently than they have to date to address the global imbalance in autism knowledge and at the same time advance our understanding of autism and our ability to deliver cost-effective services to everyone in need.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipR24 AA022919 - NIAAA NIH HHSen_US
dc.format.extent473 - 476en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAutism Resen_US
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectDiagnosisen_US
dc.subjectEarly detectionen_US
dc.subjectEpidemiologyen_US
dc.subjectInterventionen_US
dc.subjectAutistic disorderen_US
dc.subjectDeveloping countriesen_US
dc.subjectGlobal healthen_US
dc.subjectHealth services accessibilityen_US
dc.subjectHumansen_US
dc.subjectInternationalityen_US
dc.subjectDevelopmental & child psychologyen_US
dc.titleAutism screening and diagnosis in low resource settings: Challenges and opportunities to enhance research and services worldwide.en_US
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/aur.1575
pubs.elements-sourcepubmeden_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Psychological & Brain Sciencesen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-8768-5414 (Tager-Flusberg, Helen)


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution 4.0 International