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dc.contributor.authorCohen, Julia
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-01T17:59:35Z
dc.date.available2017-05-01T17:59:35Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/21829
dc.description.abstractThere are currently only two law schools represented on the Supreme Court: Harvard and Yale. This research looks to examine this recent narrowing of educational and professional backgrounds on the Supreme Court of the United States of America. Specifically, this paper looks to examine the influence the public has on Supreme Court nominations and the intricacies of public opinion surrounding potential judicial nominees. This is done by drawing from both literature reviewing the influences on Supreme Court nominations and through conducting a public opinion survey on related topics. Through analyzing this prior research and the survey results together it becomes clear that while it is problematic that there are only two law schools represented on the Supreme Court, the public has mixed views on this relative narrowing in diversity.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.subjectSupreme Court of the United Statesen_US
dc.subjectHarvard Law Schoolen_US
dc.subjectYale Law Schoolen_US
dc.subjectCourt nominationsen_US
dc.subjectDemographicsen_US
dc.subjectLaw schoolsen_US
dc.titleThe relationship between the American public and demographics on the Supreme Court: an investigation of “The Harvard- Yale-ification of the Supreme Court.”en_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameBachelor of Artsen_US
etd.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
etd.degree.disciplinePolitical Scienceen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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