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dc.contributor.authorBerthrong, Johnen_US
dc.date.accessioned2005-08-13T01:23:44Z
dc.date.available2005-08-13T01:23:44Zen_US
dc.date.available2008-03-14T00:47:17Z
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/21en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/21
dc.description.abstract“Neo-Confucianism” is the most common English term used to specify a philosophical and religious revival of Confucianism, beginning in China during the ninth century CE, as a means of restoring the tradition associated with Kongzi or Confucius and as a response to the various challenges of Daoism and Buddhism. The term “Neo-Confucian” was coined in 1903 by a Japanese scholar (preceded by an earlier French usage in the 1770s) in order to define the unique characteristics of this Confucian renaissance, which spread new trends in Confucian thought, ritual, social ethics, self-cultivation, education, critical scholarship, study of the natural world and political theory from China to Korea, Japan and Vietnam. Although the arrival of Western-inspired modernization marked the end of the Neo-Confucian epoch in East Asia, today’s so-called “New Confucianism” sees itself both as a continuation of Neo-Confucian culture and philosophy and also as a major new departure from the philosophies of the past.en_US
dc.format.extent76549 bytesen_US
dc.format.mimetypetext/htmlen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophyen_US
dc.subjectConfucianismen_US
dc.subjectPhilosophy, Confucianen_US
dc.titleNeo-Confucian Philosophyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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