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dc.contributor.authorBackstrom, Philip Nathanaelen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-06T20:02:31Z
dc.date.available2017-06-06T20:02:31Z
dc.date.issued1960
dc.date.submitted1960
dc.identifier.otherb14676527
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/22323
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Boston Universityen_US
dc.description.abstractIt was John Malcolm Forbes Ludlow (1821-1911) who conceived of English Christian Socialism and convinced many contemporaries of its value. He was responsible for establishing the Christian Socialist producer co-operatives of 1849-50 in accordance with ideas gained in France from the socialism of Louis Blanc and Benjamin Buchez. With F. D. Maurice, John Ludlow shares the credit for founding a college for the education of working men (still in existence as the Working Men's College of London). As a lawyer, Ludlow acted as constant legal advisor to the great 19th century organizations of self-help: labor unions, friendly societies, and co-operatives. [TRUNCATED]en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.rightsBased on investigation of the BU Libraries' staff, this work is free of known copyright restrictions.en_US
dc.subjectLudlow, John Malcolm Forbesen_US
dc.subjectSocial reformen_US
dc.titleJohn Malcolm Forbes Ludlow, a little known contributor to the cause of the British working man in the 19th centuryen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_US
etd.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
etd.degree.disciplineHistoryen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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