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dc.contributor.authorSeidman, Annen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-08T19:16:37Z
dc.date.available2017-06-08T19:16:37Z
dc.date.created1977
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/22397
dc.description.abstractThe evident inadequacy of orthodox models and tools of analysis has, in recent decades, led many social scientists to turn to Marxism for more helpful explanations and solutions for the problems of poverty and oppression in Africa. This is not to say there is complete agreement among these as to the nature and causes of the widespread changes which, over the last quarter of a century, have altered the major features of imperialism in Africa: the ways by which transnational corporations continue to obtain low-cost raw materials, markets for the surplus manufactures, and extract high rates of surplus value from the labors of the more than 300 million people who live there.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial 4.0 Internationalen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.subjectAfricaen_US
dc.subjectWestern Pennsylvaniaen_US
dc.subjectOhioen_US
dc.subjectPolitical activismen_US
dc.subjectSouth Africaen_US
dc.subjectVirginiaen_US
dc.subjectUnited Statesen_US
dc.subjectSouthwest United Statesen_US
dc.subjectTrade relationsen_US
dc.subjectApartheiden_US
dc.titlePost World War II imperialism in Africa: a Marxist perspectiveen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International