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dc.contributor.authorGrossberg, Stephenen_US
dc.contributor.authorRepin, Dmitryen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-14T19:00:15Z
dc.date.available2011-11-14T19:00:15Z
dc.date.issued1999-10
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/2241
dc.description.abstractMany psychophysical experiments have shown that the representation of numbers and numerical quantities in humans and animals is related to number magnitude. A neural network model is proposed to quantitatively simulate error rates in quantification and numerical comparison tasks, and reaction times for number priming and numerical assessment and comparison tasks. Transient responses to inputs arc integrated before they activate an ordered spatial map that selectively responds to the number of events in a sequence. The dynamics of numerical comparison are encoded in activity pattern changes within this spatial map. Such changes cause a "directional comparison wave" whose properties mimic data about numerical comparison. These model mechanisms are variants of neural mechanisms that have elsewhere been used to explain data about motion perception, attention shifts, and target tracking. Thus, the present model suggests how numerical representations may have emerged as specializations of more primitive mechanisms in the cortical Where processing stream.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundation (IRI-97-20333); Defense Advanced research Projects Agency and the Office of Naval Research (N00014-95-1-0409); National Institute of Health (1-R29-DC02952-01)en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston University Center for Adaptive Systems and Department of Cognitive and Neural Systemsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesBU CAS/CNS Technical Reports;CAS/CNS-TR-1999-024
dc.rightsCopyright 1999 Boston University. Permission to copy without fee all or part of this material is granted provided that: 1. The copies are not made or distributed for direct commercial advantage; 2. the report title, author, document number, and release date appear, and notice is given that copying is by permission of BOSTON UNIVERSITY TRUSTEES. To copy otherwise, or to republish, requires a fee and / or special permission.en_US
dc.titleA Neural Model of How The Brain Represents and Compares Numbersen_US
dc.typeTechnical Reporten_US
dc.rights.holderBoston University Trusteesen_US


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