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dc.contributor.authorSeidman, Annen_US
dc.coverage.spatialAfricaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-14T13:16:55Z
dc.date.available2017-06-14T13:16:55Z
dc.date.issued1980
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/22442
dc.descriptionDraft copy of a paper presented at the 23rd Annual Meeting of the African Studies Association "Charge and Contrasts: New Directions and Traditional Ties in Africa" Philadephia, October 15-18, 1980.en_US
dc.description.abstractA deeply structured dualism typically characterizes third world-mining economies. A relatively small percentage of the national labor force, working in an isolated enclave, employs modern, highly complex, capital-intensive machinery and equipment to dig out rich minerals and freights tnem in high-powered trains or trucks to foreign factories. The managers of the mines import almost all the inputs: the machinery, the materials used for construction of the mines, the workers' houses, the roads -- even the foodstuffs the workers eat. [TRUNCATED]en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial 4.0 Internationalen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.subjectMiningen_US
dc.subjectIndustrial developmenten_US
dc.subjectAfricaen_US
dc.titlePlanning for development in a mineral-based economyen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US


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Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International