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dc.contributor.authorCostanza, Roberten_US
dc.contributor.authorPosner, Stephenen_US
dc.contributor.authorTalberth, Johnen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-03T12:23:23Z
dc.date.available2017-07-03T12:23:23Z
dc.date.copyright2009
dc.date.issued2009-01
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/22665
dc.descriptionThis repository item contains a single issue of The Pardee Papers, a series papers that began publishing in 2008 by the Boston University Frederick S. Pardee Center for the Study of the Longer-Range Future. The Pardee Papers series features working papers by Pardee Center Fellows and other invited authors. Papers in this series explore current and future challenges by anticipating the pathways to human progress, human development, and human well-being. This series includes papers on a wide range of topics, with a special emphasis on interdisciplinary perspectives and a development orientation.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis paper is a call for better indicators of human well-being in nations around the world. We critique the inappropriate use of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) as a measure of national well-being, something for which it was never designed. We also question the idea that economic growth is always synonymous with improved well-being. Useful measures of progress and well-being must be measures of the degree to which society’s goals (i.e., to sustainably provide basic human needs for food, shelter, freedom, participation, etc.) are met, rather than measures of the mere volume of marketed economic activity, which is only one means to that end. Various alternatives and complements to GDP are discussed in terms of their motives, objectives, and limitations. Some of these are revised measures of economic activity while others measure changes in community capital—natural, social, human, and built—in an attempt to measure the extent to which development is using up the principle of community capital rather than living off its interest. We conclude that much useful work has been done; many of the alternative indicators have been used successfully in various levels of community planning. But the continued misuse of GDP as a measure of well-being necessitates an immediate, aggressive, and ongoing campaign to change the indicators that decision makers are using to guide policies and evaluate progress. We need indicators that promote truly sustainable development—development that improves the quality of human life while living within the carrying capacity of the supporting ecosystems. We end with a call for consensus on appropriate new measures of progress toward this new social goal.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston University Frederick S. Pardee Center for the Study of the Longer-Range Futureen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesThe Pardee Papers;4
dc.rightsCopyright 2009 Boston University. Permission to copy without fee all or part of this material is granted provided that: 1. The copies are not made or distributed for direct commercial advantage; 2. the report title, author, document number, and release date appear, and notice is given that copying is by permission of BOSTON UNIVERSITY TRUSTEES. To copy otherwise, or to republish, requires a fee and / or special permission.en_US
dc.subjectGross domestic producten_US
dc.subjectWell-beingen_US
dc.subjectQuality of lifeen_US
dc.subjectSocial indicatorsen_US
dc.titleBeyond GDP: the need for new measures of progressen_US
dc.typeOtheren_US
dc.rights.holderBoston University Trusteesen_US
dc.identifier.issue4


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