Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorEtzioni, Amitaien_US
dc.contributor.authorBuultjens, Ralphen_US
dc.contributor.authorChace, Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.authorFromkin, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.authorGoldstein, Eriken_US
dc.contributor.authorJackson, Roberten_US
dc.contributor.authorKimball, Rogeren_US
dc.contributor.authorMaître, Joachimen_US
dc.contributor.authorMorrow, Lanceen_US
dc.contributor.authorProdromou, Elizabethen_US
dc.contributor.authorRosenthal, Joelen_US
dc.contributor.authorSilber, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Tonyen_US
dc.contributor.authorStith, Charlesen_US
dc.contributor.authorZakaria, Fareeden_US
dc.contributor.otherFrederick S. Pardee Center for the Study of the Longer-Range Futureen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-13T20:13:07Z
dc.date.available2017-07-13T20:13:07Z
dc.date.copyright2006
dc.date.issued2001
dc.identifier.isbn0-87270-139-5
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/22884
dc.descriptionThis repository item contains a single issue of the Pardee Conference Series, a publication series that began publishing in 2006 by the Boston University Frederick S. Pardee Center for the Study of the Longer-Range Future. This was the Center's Inaugural Conference that took place during November 8, 9, and 10, 2001. Organized by David Fromkin, Director Frederick S. Pardee Center for the Study of the Longer-Range Future. Co-Sponsored by Boston University and Carnegie Council on Ethics and International Affairs.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis conference brought together a discussion of different perspectives on what future paradigm shifts will look like – in government, in foreign policy, in what constitutes “classics,” in economic and religious modes, and changes in the interaction between these values. The conference agreed that today’s Western society values democracy, constitutionalism, liberalism, rule of law, open society, and market economy. These are not contingent upon one another and may change. But the “needs and aspirations” of humanity will at their most essential core remain the same. The amount and type of power given to governments is not a fixed thing, and developments in the meaning of democracy and how it is achieved may illustrate this.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston University Frederick S. Pardee Center for the Study of the Longer-Range Futureen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPardee Center conference series;Fall 2001
dc.rightsCopyright 2006 Boston University. Permission to copy without fee all or part of this material is granted provided that: 1. The copies are not made or distributed for direct commercial advantage; 2. the report title, author, document number, and release date appear, and notice is given that copying is by permission of BOSTON UNIVERSITY TRUSTEES. To copy otherwise, or to republish, requires a fee and / or special permission.en_US
dc.subjectGovernmentsen_US
dc.subjectEconomicsen_US
dc.subjectPolitical scienceen_US
dc.subjectModernizationen_US
dc.titleChanging and unchanging values in the world of the future, November 8, 9, and 10, 2001en_US
dc.typeBooken_US
dc.rights.holderTrustees of Boston Universityen_US


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record