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dc.contributor.authorRosen, Sydneyen_US
dc.contributor.authorSimon, Jonathonen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-01T14:44:58Z
dc.date.available2017-08-01T14:44:58Z
dc.date.copyright2002
dc.date.issued2002-05
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/23248
dc.descriptionThis repository item contains a single issue of the Health and Development Discussion Papers, an informal working paper series that began publishing in 2002 by the Boston University Center for Global Health and Development. It is intended to help the Center and individual authors to disseminate work that is being prepared for journal publication or that is not appropriate for journal publication but might still have value to readers.en_US
dc.description.abstractAs the economic burden of HIV/AIDS increases in sub-Saharan Africa, the allocation of the burden among levels and sectors of societies is changing. The private sector has greater scope than government, households, or NGOs to avoid the economic burden of AIDS, and a systematic shifting of the burden away from the private sector is underway. Common practices that shift the AIDS burden from businesses to households and government include pre-employment screening, reduced employee benefits, restructured employment contracts, outsourcing of less skilled jobs, selective retrenchments, and changes in production technologies. In South Africa, more than two thirds of large employers have reduced health care benefits or required larger contributions by employees. Most firms have replaced defined benefit retirement funds, which expose the firm to large annual costs but provide long-term support for families, with defined contribution funds, which eliminate firm risk but provide little to families of younger workers who die of AIDS. Contracting out of previously permanent jobs also shields firms from costs while leaving households and government to care for affected workers and their families. Many of these changes are responses to globalization and would have occurred in the absence of AIDS, but they are devastating for employees with HIV/AIDS. This paper argues that the shifting of the economic burden of AIDS is a predictable response by business to which a thoughtful public policy response is needed. Countries should make explicit decisions about each sector’s responsibilities if a socially desirable allocation is to be achieved.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston University Center for Global Health and Developmenten_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesHealth and Development Discussion Papers;1
dc.rightsCopyright 2002 Boston University. Permission to copy without fee all or part of this material is granted provided that: 1. The copies are not made or distributed for direct commercial advantage; 2. the report title, author, document number, and release date appear, and notice is given that copying is by permission of BOSTON UNIVERSITY TRUSTEES. To copy otherwise, or to republish, requires a fee and / or special permission.en_US
dc.subjectHuman immunodeficiency virus (HIV)en_US
dc.subjectAcquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)en_US
dc.subjectEconomic burdenen_US
dc.subjectBusiness responseen_US
dc.subjectEmployee benefitsen_US
dc.subjectSouth Africaen_US
dc.subjectHIV/AIDSen_US
dc.titleShifting the burden of HIV/AIDSen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.rights.holderBoston University Trusteesen_US
dc.identifier.issue1


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