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dc.contributor.authorLarson, Bruceen_US
dc.contributor.authorRosen, Sydneyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-01T14:45:00Z
dc.date.available2017-08-01T14:45:00Z
dc.date.copyright2002
dc.date.issued2002-11
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/23249
dc.descriptionThis repository item contains a single issue of the Health and Development Discussion Papers, an informal working paper series that began publishing in 2002 by the Boston University Center for Global Health and Development. It is intended to help the Center and individual authors to disseminate work that is being prepared for journal publication or that is not appropriate for journal publication but might still have value to readers.en_US
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Achieving the goals set by Roll Back Malaria and the Government of Kenya for use of insecticide treated bednets (ITNs) will require that the private retail market for nets and insecticide treatments grow substantially. This paper applies some basic concepts of market structure and pricing to a set of recently-collected retail price data from Kenya in order to answer the question, “How well are Kenyan retail markets for ITNs working?” METHODS: Data on the availability and prices of ITNs at a wide range of retail outlets throughout Kenya were collected in January 2002, and vendors and manufacturers were interviewed regarding market structure. FINDINGS: Untreated nets are manufactured in Kenya by a number of companies and are widely available in large and medium-sized towns. Availability in smaller villages is limited. There is relatively little geographic price variation, and nets can be found at competitive prices in towns and cities. Marketing margins on prices appear to be within normal ranges. No finished nets are imported. Few pre-treated nets or net+treatment combinations are available, with the exception of the subsidized Supanet/Power Tab combination marketed by a donor-funded social marketing project. CONCLUSIONS: Retail markets for untreated nets in Kenya are well established and appear to be competitive. Markets for treated nets and insecticide treatment kits are not well established. The role of subsidized ITN marketing projects should be monitored to ensure that these projects support, rather than hinder, the development of retail markets.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston University Center for Global Health and Developmenten_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesHealth and Development Discussion Papers;2
dc.rightsCopyright 2002 Boston University. Permission to copy without fee all or part of this material is granted provided that: 1. The copies are not made or distributed for direct commercial advantage; 2. the report title, author, document number, and release date appear, and notice is given that copying is by permission of BOSTON UNIVERSITY TRUSTEES. To copy otherwise, or to republish, requires a fee and / or special permission.en_US
dc.subjectMalariaen_US
dc.subjectKenyaen_US
dc.subjectInsecticide-treated bednetsen_US
dc.subjectMalaria preventionen_US
dc.subjectInsecticideen_US
dc.titleThe retail market for bednets in Kenya: how well is it working?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.rights.holderBoston University Trusteesen_US
dc.identifier.issue2


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