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dc.contributor.authorFeeley, Richen_US
dc.contributor.authorFox, Matthewen_US
dc.contributor.authorHamazakaza, Petanen_US
dc.contributor.authorRosen, Sydneyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-01T14:52:47Z
dc.date.available2017-08-01T14:52:47Z
dc.date.copyright2006
dc.date.issued2006-06
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/23254
dc.descriptionThis repository item contains a single issue of the Health and Development Discussion Papers, an informal working paper series that began publishing in 2002 by the Boston University Center for Global Health and Development. It is intended to help the Center and individual authors to disseminate work that is being prepared for journal publication or that is not appropriate for journal publication but might still have value to readers.en_US
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: The loss of working-aged adults to HIV/AIDS has been shown to increase the costs of labor to the private sector in Africa. There is little corresponding evidence for the public sector. This study evaluated the impact of AIDS on the capacity of a government agency, the Zambia Wildlife Authority (ZAWA), to patrol Zambia’s national parks. METHODS: Data were collected from ZAWA on workforce characteristics, recent mortality, costs, and the number of days spent on patrol between 2003 and 2005 by a sample of 76 current patrol officers (reference subjects) and 11 patrol officers who died of AIDS or suspected AIDS (index subjects). An estimate was made of the impact of AIDS on service delivery capacity and labor costs and the potential net benefits of providing treatment. RESULTS: Reference subjects spent an average of 197.4 days on patrol per year. After adjusting for age, years of service, and worksite, index subjects spent 62.8 days on patrol in their last year of service (68% decrease, p<0.0001), 96.8 days on patrol in their second to last year of service (51% decrease, p<0.0001), and 123.7 days on patrol in their third to last year of service (37% decrease, p<0.0001). For each employee who died, ZAWA lost an additional 111 person-days for management, funeral attendance, vacancy, and recruitment and training of a replacement, resulting in a total productivity loss per death of 2.0 person-years. Each AIDS-related death also imposed budgetary costs for care, benefits, recruitment, and training equivalent to 3.3 years’ annual compensation. In 2005, AIDS reduced service delivery capacity by 6.2% and increased labor costs by 9.7%. If antiretroviral therapy could be provided for $500/patient/year, net savings to ZAWA would approach $285,000/year. CONCLUSION: AIDS is constraining ZAWA’s ability to protect Zambia’s wildlife and parks. Impacts on this government agency are substantially larger than have been observed in the private sector. Provision of ART would result in net budgetary savings to ZAWA and greatly increase its service delivery capacity.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston University Center for Global Health and Developmenten_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesHealth and Development Discussion Papers;8
dc.rightsCopyright 2006 Boston University. Permission to copy without fee all or part of this material is granted provided that: 1. The copies are not made or distributed for direct commercial advantage; 2. the report title, author, document number, and release date appear, and notice is given that copying is by permission of BOSTON UNIVERSITY TRUSTEES. To copy otherwise, or to republish, requires a fee and / or special permission.en_US
dc.subjectHuman immunodeficiency virus (HIV)en_US
dc.subjectAcquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)en_US
dc.subjectHIV/AIDSen_US
dc.subjectAntiretroviral therapyen_US
dc.subjectZambiaen_US
dc.subjectLabor productivityen_US
dc.subjectGovernmenten_US
dc.titleThe impact of AIDS on government service delivery: the case of the Zambia Wildlife Authorityen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.rights.holderBoston University Trusteesen_US
dc.identifier.issue8


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