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dc.contributor.authorCunningham, Edward A.
dc.contributor.otherBoston University Frederick S. Pardee School of Global Studies
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-24T21:25:54Z
dc.date.available2017-08-24T21:25:54Z
dc.date.issued2015-03
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/23670
dc.descriptionThis repository item contains a working paper from the Boston University Global Economic Governance Initiative. The Global Economic Governance Initiative (GEGI) is a research program of the Center for Finance, Law & Policy, the Frederick S. Pardee Center for the Study of the Longer-Range Future, and the Frederick S. Pardee School of Global Studies. It was founded in 2008 to advance policy-relevant knowledge about governance for financial stability, human development, and the environment.
dc.description.abstractThis paper focuses primarily on the evolution of China’s domestic energy governance, the waves of centralization and decentralization that have characterized the relationship between industry and government in this sector, and the resulting structure of China’s energy industries. It is important to understand both the fragmentation of the governance structure and mechanisms available to the Chinese state, and the twin processes of ownership and investment diversification that have shaped the bulk of China’s natural energy market. This domestic context provides a useful framework for further analysis of China’s energy and natural resource investments abroad.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston University Global Economic Governance Initiative
dc.relation.ispartofseriesGEGI Working Paper; Paper 1, March 2015
dc.rightsCopyright 2015 Boston University. Permission to copy without fee all or part of this material is granted provided that: 1. The copies are not made or distributed for direct commercial advantage; 2. the report title, author, document number, and release date appear, and notice is given that copying is by permission of BOSTON UNIVERSITY TRUSTEES. To copy otherwise, or to republish, requires a fee and / or special permission.
dc.subjectChina
dc.subjectEnergy industry
dc.subjectNatural resources
dc.subjectDomestic investments
dc.subjectGovernance
dc.titleThe state and the firm: China’s energy governance in context
dc.typeArticle
dc.rights.holderBoston University


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