Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMez, Jesseen_US
dc.contributor.authorDaneshvar, Daniel H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKiernan, Patrick T.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAbdolmohammadi, Bobaken_US
dc.contributor.authorAlvarez, Victor E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHuber, Bertrand R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAlosco, Michael L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSolomon, Todd M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNowinski, Christopher J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMcHale, Lisaen_US
dc.contributor.authorCormier, Kerry A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKubilus, Caroline A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMartin, Brett M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, Laurenen_US
dc.contributor.authorBaugh, Christine M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMontenigro, Phillip H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorChaisson, Christine E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTripodis, Yorghosen_US
dc.contributor.authorKowall, Neil W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWeuve, Jenniferen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcClean, Michael D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCantu, Robert C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGoldstein, Lee E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKatz, Douglas I.en_US
dc.contributor.authorStern, Robert A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorStein, Thor D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMcKee, Ann C.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-07T19:27:43Z
dc.date.available2017-09-07T19:27:43Z
dc.date.issued2017-07-25
dc.identifier.citationMez J, Daneshvar DH, Kiernan PT, Abdolmohammadi B, Alvarez VE, Huber BR, Alosco ML, Solomon TM, Nowinski CJ, McHale L, Cormier KA, Kubilus CA, Martin BM, Murphy L, Baugh CM, Montenigro PH, Chaisson CE, Tripodis Y, Kowall NW, Weuve J, McClean MD, Cantu RC, Goldstein LE, Katz DI, Stern RA, Stein TD, McKee AC. Clinicopathological Evaluation of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy in Players of American Football. JAMA. 2017;318(4):360–370. doi:10.1001/jama.2017.8334
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/23741
dc.description.abstractIMPORTANCE: Players of American football may be at increased risk of long-term neurological conditions, particularly chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). OBJECTIVE: To determine the neuropathological and clinical features of deceased football players with CTE. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Case series of 202 football players whose brains were donated for research. Neuropathological evaluations and retrospective telephone clinical assessments (including head trauma history) with informants were performed blinded. Online questionnaires ascertained athletic and military history. EXPOSURES: Participation in American football at any level of play. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Neuropathological diagnoses of neurodegenerative diseases, including CTE, based on defined diagnostic criteria; CTE neuropathological severity (stages I to IV or dichotomized into mild [stages I and II] and severe [stages III and IV]); informant-reported athletic history and, for players who died in 2014 or later, clinical presentation, including behavior, mood, and cognitive symptoms and dementia. RESULTS: Among 202 deceased former football players (median age at death, 66 years [interquartile range, 47-76 years]), CTE was neuropathologically diagnosed in 177 players (87%; median age at death, 67 years [interquartile range, 52-77 years]; mean years of football participation, 15.1 [SD, 5.2]), including 0 of 2 pre–high school, 3 of 14 high school (21%), 48 of 53 college (91%), 9 of 14 semiprofessional (64%), 7 of 8 Canadian Football League (88%), and 110 of 111 National Football League (99%) players. Neuropathological severity of CTE was distributed across the highest level of play, with all 3 former high school players having mild pathology and the majority of former college (27 [56%]), semiprofessional (5 [56%]), and professional (101 [86%]) players having severe pathology. Among 27 participants with mild CTE pathology, 26 (96%) had behavioral or mood symptoms or both, 23 (85%) had cognitive symptoms, and 9 (33%) had signs of dementia. Among 84 participants with severe CTE pathology, 75 (89%) had behavioral or mood symptoms or both, 80 (95%) had cognitive symptoms, and 71 (85%) had signs of dementia. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: In a convenience sample of deceased football players who donated their brains for research, a high proportion had neuropathological evidence of CTE, suggesting that CTE may be related to prior participation in football.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study received support from NINDS (grants U01 NS086659, R01 NS078337, R56 NS078337, U01 NS093334, and F32 NS096803), the National Institute on Aging (grants K23 AG046377, P30AG13846 and supplement 0572063345-5, R01 AG1649), the US Department of Defense (grant W81XWH-13-2-0064), the US Department of Veterans Affairs (I01 CX001038), the Veterans Affairs Biorepository (CSP 501), the Veterans Affairs Rehabilitation Research and Development Traumatic Brain Injury Center of Excellence (grant B6796-C), the Department of Defense Peer Reviewed Alzheimer’s Research Program (grant 13267017), the National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment, the Alzheimer’s Association (grants NIRG-15-362697 and NIRG-305779), the Concussion Legacy Foundation, the Andlinger Family Foundation, the WWE, and the NFL.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Medical Associationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJAMA;318(4)
dc.subjectChronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE)en_US
dc.subjectAmerican footballen_US
dc.subjectAmerican football playersen_US
dc.subjectNeurodegenerative diseasesen_US
dc.titleClinicopathological evaluation of chronic traumatic encephalopathy in players of American footballen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1001/jama.2017.8334


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record