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dc.contributor.authorDietiker, Leslieen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-11T14:11:57Z
dc.date.available2017-09-11T14:11:57Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationLeslie Dietiker. 2016. "Generating Student Interest with Mathematical Stories." The Mathematics Teacher, Volume 110, Issue 4, pp. 304 - 304.
dc.identifier.issn0025-5769
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/23756
dc.description.abstractImagine you are planning an algebra lesson involving the roots of quadratic equations, and you have decided to base your lesson on the three tasks listed in figure 1. Assuming that your students have some experience with factoring quadratics, solving equations, and graphing, but no experience with completing the square, calculating a vertex, or quadratic formula, consider how you might sequence these tasks. How might the potential mathematical goals change based on the sequence? Are there any benefits to student interest or engagement by ordering the tasks in one sequence over another? Note: The reader is encouraged to solve these tasks as algebra students and consider these questions before proceeding. You may be surprised at what you find. The tasks have been provided in a form that allows a reader to cut them apart and experiment with different sequences.en_US
dc.format.extent304 - 304en_US
dc.relation.ispartofThe Mathematics Teacher
dc.subjectMathematics educationen_US
dc.titleGenerating student interest with mathematical storiesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.5951/mathteacher.110.4.0304
pubs.elements-sourcecrossrefen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, School of Educationen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US


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