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dc.contributor.authorDavis, John Whitneyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-23T01:59:14Z
dc.date.available2017-09-23T01:59:14Z
dc.date.issued1957
dc.date.submitted1957
dc.identifier.otherb14660076
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/23902
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Boston Universityen_US
dc.description.abstractLocke, Berkeley, and Hume--referred to as "the classical British empiricists"--are examined for the extent to which a doctrine, called 'imagism' by Price, played a formative role in their philosophies. Imagism as defined has two main varieties, the polemical version and the constructive version. According to the former, images are the primary symbols in thinking and all other symbols are secondary and derivative. According to the latter, thought is the manipulation of mental images. It is this latter doctrine which is demonstrated as applicable to the classical British empiricists; so far as the former doctrine appears at all, it is an aberrant doctrine.[TRUNCATED]en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.rightsBased on investigation of the BU Libraries' staff, this work is free of known copyright restrictions.en_US
dc.subjectImagismen_US
dc.subjectEmpiricismen_US
dc.subjectLocke, John, 1632-1704en_US
dc.subjectBerkeley, George, 1685-1753en_US
dc.subjectHume, David, 1711-1776en_US
dc.subjectGreat Britainen_US
dc.titleImagism in Locke, Berkeley and Humeen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_US
etd.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
etd.degree.disciplinePhilosophyen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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