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dc.contributor.authorSchmidt, Jamesen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-12T17:36:19Z
dc.date.available2011-12-12T17:36:19Z
dc.date.available2013-01-24T20:25:01Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.citationSchmidt, James. "Cenotaphs in Sound: Catastrophe, Memory, and Musical Memorials." Proceedings of the European Society for Aesthetics 2 (2010), 454-78.
dc.identifier.issn1664-5278
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/2407
dc.descriptionOriginally published at http://proceedings.eurosa.org/2/schmidt.pdfen_US
dc.description.abstractThis paper examines the peculiar status of musical compositions that are intended to serve as memorials of victims of political violence. It considers four examples of this genre: John Foulds' World Requiem (1923), Arnold Schoenberg's A Survivor from Warsaw (1947), Steve Reich's Different Trains (1988), and John Adams' On the Transmigration of Souls (2002).en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherEuropean Society for Aestheticsen_US
dc.rightsAttribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives 3.0 Unporteden_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/
dc.titleCenotaphs in Sound: Catastrophe, Memory, and Musical Memorialsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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