Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorLavalli K. L.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-01T18:44:23Z
dc.date.available2017-11-01T18:44:23Z
dc.date.issued1991-01-01
dc.identifierhttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1991FE84000007&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=6e74115fe3da270499c3d65c9b17d654
dc.identifier.citationK. L. Lavalli. 1991. "Survival and growth of early-juvenile American lobsters Homarus americanus through their 1st season while fed diets of mesoplankton, micro plankton, and frozen brine shrimp." Fishery Bulletin, v. 89, Issue 1, pp. 61-68.
dc.identifier.issn0090-0656
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/24687
dc.description.abstractAmerican lobsters Homarus america.nus were fed diets of mesoplankton in filtered seawater, meso/ microplankton combination in filtered seawater, and frozen brine shrimp in both filtered and unfiltered seawater to determine if mesoplankton diets could sustain survival and growth throughout most of the first year of molts and if smaller zooplankters and phytoplankton in the mesol microplankton diet could be utilized as food and could sustain survival in periods of low food supply. At the beginning of the experiment, there were no significant differences in either carapace length or weight between the groups of sibling lobsters. Lobsters fed mesoplankton had high survival (80%) and significant increases in both carapace length and weight, although they weighed less at Stage IX than those fed frozen brine shrimp in unfiltered seawater. Lobsters fed frozen brine shrimp in filtered seawater had low survival (15%), but did not differ significantly at Stage IX from those fed mesoplankton in terms of both carapace length and weight. Lobsters fed brine shrimp in unfiltered seawater had high survival rates (95%) and weighed nearly twice as much at Stage IX than both the brine shrimp-fed lobsters in filtered seawater and the mesoplankton-fed lobsters; however, none of these three surviving groups differed significantly in carapace length at Stage IX. Intermolt periods for the three surviving groups were not significantly different until the molt between Stage VIII and IX when the mesoplankton-fed lobsters took nearly twice as long to molt as either of the brine shrimp-fed groups. Lobsters fed mesolmicroplankton did not molt out of Stage V and died within 36 days of the 107-day experiment. These results indicate that mesoplankton diets promote growth and survival of lobsters throughout most of their first season of molting and that larger planktonic organisms may contain essential nutritional requirements not met by brine shrimp alone. However, the meso/microplankton diet, consisting mostly of diatoms, does not provide sufficient nutrition for survival dwing periods of starvation.en_US
dc.format.extentp. 61-68en_US
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherNational Marine Fisheries Service Scientific Publication Officeen_US
dc.relation.ispartofFishery Bulletin
dc.rightsBased on investigation of the BU Libraries' staff, this work is free of known copyright restrictions.en_US
dc.rightsBased on investigation of the BU Libraries' staff, this work is free of known copyright restrictionsen_US
dc.subjectFisheriesen_US
dc.subjectScience & technologyen_US
dc.subjectLife sciences & biomedicineen_US
dc.subjectBehavioren_US
dc.subjectLarvalen_US
dc.subjectAsymmetryen_US
dc.titleSurvival and growth of early-juvenile American lobsters Homarus americanus through their 1st season while fed diets of mesoplankton, microplankton, and frozen brine shrimpen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
pubs.elements-sourceweb-of-scienceen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of General Studiesen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record