Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorGarrett, Rachael D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNiles, Meredithen_US
dc.contributor.authorGil, Julianaen_US
dc.contributor.authorDy, Philipen_US
dc.contributor.authorReis, Julioen_US
dc.contributor.authorValentim, Judsonen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-06T19:55:19Z
dc.date.available2017-11-06T19:55:19Z
dc.date.issued2017-03-01
dc.identifierhttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000398714100148&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=6e74115fe3da270499c3d65c9b17d654
dc.identifier.citationRachael D. Garrett, Meredith Niles, Juliana Gil, Philip Dy, Julio Reis, Judson Valentim. 2017. "Policies for reintegrating crop and livestock systems: a comparative analysis." Sustainability, v. 9, Issue 3, pp. 1-22.
dc.identifier.issn2071-1050
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/24695
dc.description.abstractThe reintegration of crop and livestock systems within the same land area has the potential to improve soil quality and reduce water and air pollution, while maintaining high yields and reducing risk. In this study, we characterize the degree to which federal policies in three major global food production regions that span a range of socioeconomic contexts, Brazil, New Zealand, and the United States, incentivize or disincentivize the use of integrated crop and livestock practices (ICLS). Our analysis indicates that Brazil and New Zealand have the most favorable policy environment for ICLS, while the United States provides the least favorable environment. The balance of policy incentives and disincentives across our three cases studies mirrors current patterns of ICLS usage. Brazil and New Zealand have both undergone a trend toward mixed crop livestock systems in recent years, while the United States has transitioned rapidly toward continuous crop and livestock production. If transitions to ICLS are desired, particularly in the United States, it will be necessary to change agricultural, trade, environmental, biofuels, and food safety policies that currently buffer farmers from risk, provide too few incentives for pollution reduction, and restrict the presence of animals in crop areas. It will also be necessary to invest more in research and development in all countries to identify the most profitable ICLS technologies in each region.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by the United States National Science Foundation grant number 1415352, Sustainability Science Program at Harvard University, and the Italian Ministry for Environment, Land and Sea. This work was made possible through cooperation with the Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation (Embrapa), AgResearch New Zealand, Plant and Food Research New Zealand, and University of California Davis Cooperative Extension. (1415352 - United States National Science Foundation; Sustainability Science Program at Harvard University; Italian Ministry for Environment, Land and Sea)en_US
dc.format.extentp. 1-22en_US
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherMDPI AGen_US
dc.relation.ispartofSustainability
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectUnited Statesen_US
dc.subjectNew Zealanden_US
dc.subjectBrazilen_US
dc.subjectScience & technologyen_US
dc.subjectLife sciences & biomedicineen_US
dc.subjectGreen & sustainable science & technologyen_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental sciencesen_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental studiesen_US
dc.subjectSustainable agricultureen_US
dc.subjectAgroecologyen_US
dc.subjectSupply chain configurationsen_US
dc.subjectLand-use changeen_US
dc.subjectBiofuel policiesen_US
dc.subjectFarming systemsen_US
dc.subjectHigh-plainsen_US
dc.subjectAgricultureen_US
dc.titlePolicies for reintegrating crop and livestock systems: a comparative analysisen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/su9030473
pubs.elements-sourceweb-of-scienceen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: No embargoen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Earth & Environmenten_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-6171-263X (Garrett, Rachael D)


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution 4.0 International