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dc.contributor.authorHalonen, Jaana I.en_US
dc.contributor.authorZanobetti, Antonellaen_US
dc.contributor.authorSparrow, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.authorVokonas, Pantel S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSchwartz, Joelen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-29T21:03:24Z
dc.date.available2011-12-29T21:03:24Z
dc.date.copyright2010
dc.date.issued2010-7-23
dc.identifier.citationHalonen, Jaana I, Antonella Zanobetti, David Sparrow, Pantel S Vokonas, Joel Schwartz. "Associations between outdoor temperature and markers of inflammation: a cohort study" Environmental Health 9:42. (2010)
dc.identifier.issn1476-069X
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/2554
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Associations between ambient temperature and cardiovascular mortality are well established. This study investigated whether inflammation could be part of the mechanism leading to temperature-related cardiovascular deaths. METHODS: The study population consisted of a cohort of 673 men with mean age of 74.6 years, living in the greater Boston area. They were seen for examination roughly every 4 years, and blood samples for inflammation marker analyses were drawn in 2000-2008 (total of 1254 visits). We used a mixed effects model to estimate the associations between ambient temperature and a variety of inflammation markers (C-reactive protein, white blood cell count, soluble Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1, soluble Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and interleukins -1β, -6 and -8). Random intercept for each subject and several possible confounders, including combustion-related air pollution and ozone, were used in the models. RESULTS: We found a 0 to 1 day lagged and up to 4 weeks cumulative responses in C-reactive protein in association with temperature. We observed a 24.9% increase [95% Confidence interval (CI): 7.36, 45.2] in C-reactive protein for a 5°C decrease in the 4 weeks' moving average of temperature. We observed similar associations also between temperature and soluble Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 (4.52%, 95% CI: 1.05, 8.10, over 4 weeks' moving average), and between temperature and soluble Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (6.60%, 95% CI: 1.31, 12.2 over 4 weeks' moving average). Penalized spline models showed no deviation from linearity. There were no associations between temperature and other inflammation markers. CONCLUSIONS: Cumulative exposure to decreased temperature is associated with an increase in inflammation marker levels among elderly men. This suggests that inflammation markers are part of intermediate processes, which may lead to cold-, but not heat-, related cardiovascular deaths.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipe National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (ES014663, ES15172, ES-00002); United States Environmental Protection Agency (R83241);Cooperative Studies Program/Epidemiology Research and Information Centers of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs; Massachusetts Veterans Epidemiology Research and Information Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Finnish Cultural Foundation; Finnish Foundation for Cardiovascular Researchen_US
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen_US
dc.rightsCopyright 2010 Halonen et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0
dc.titleAssociations between outdoor temperature and markers of inflammation: a cohort studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1476-069X-9-42
dc.identifier.pmid20653951
dc.identifier.pmcid2920265


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Copyright 2010 Halonen et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright 2010 Halonen et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.