Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorAlonso, Alvaroen_US
dc.contributor.authorLogroscino, Giancarloen_US
dc.contributor.authorJick, Susan Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorHernán, Miguel Aen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-29T22:39:39Z
dc.date.available2011-12-29T22:39:39Z
dc.date.copyright2010
dc.date.issued2010-1-14
dc.identifier.citationAlonso, Alvaro, Giancarlo Logroscino, Susan S Jick, Miguel A Hernán. "Association of smoking with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis risk and survival in men and women: a prospective study" BMC Neurology 10:6. (2010)
dc.identifier.issn1471-2377
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/2587
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Previous epidemiologic studies have examined the association of smoking with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) incidence, but their results have been inconsistent. Moreover, limited information exists on the association between smoking and survival in ALS patients. We evaluated the association of smoking with ALS incidence and survival in a population-based cohort. METHODS: We conducted a case-control study nested in the General Practice Research Database, a computerized clinical database in the United Kingdom. Cases were 1143 individuals with a diagnosis of ALS; 11,371 matched controls were selected among GPRD participants free of ALS. Predictors of survival were determined in the ALS cases. Smoking information was obtained from the computer database. RESULTS: Smoking was not associated with the risk of ALS in this population. The rate ratio (RR) of ALS comparing ever versus never smokers was 1.04, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.80-1.34. In analysis stratified by gender, however, ever smoking was associated with ALS in women (RR 1.53, 95% CI 1.04-2.23) but not in men (RR 0.75, 95% CI 0.53-1.06). Mortality was 71% after 2.1 average years of follow-up. Old age and female sex were associated with lower survival. Smoking was a predictor of mortality only in women. Comparing ever versus never smokers, RR (95% CI) of death was 1.31 (1.04-1.65) in women, and 0.90 (0.72-1.11) in men. CONCLUSION: In this large population-based study, smoking was associated with ALS risk and worse survival in women but not in men.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipGrant-in-Aid from the Graduate School, University of Minnesota; National Institutes of Health National Institute on Aging (P30 AG024409-03); Program on the Global Epidemiology of Aging at Harvard Universityen_US
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen_US
dc.rightsCopyright 2010 Alonso et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0
dc.titleAssociation of Smoking with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Risk and Survival in Men and Women: A Prospective Studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2377-10-6
dc.identifier.pmid20074360
dc.identifier.pmcid2820482


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Copyright 2010 Alonso et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright 2010 Alonso et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.