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dc.contributor.authorKlein, Malcolm W.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-21T14:48:14Z
dc.date.available2017-12-21T14:48:14Z
dc.date.issued1961
dc.date.submitted1961
dc.identifier.otherb1468942x
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/26023
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Boston Universityen_US
dc.description.abstractThis study tests the proposition that the speed of recognition of ambiguous visual stimuli can be predicted from propositions derived from behavioral conflict theory. A literature review indicates that no common, generally accepted conceptualization of the nature of ambiguity exists, and that confusion abounds due to the myriad purposes, definitions, and operations involved in previous studies involving ambiguous factors. Several writers have suggested the similarity of ambiguous stimuli to conflict-arousing stimuli; and several conflict factors have been shown to affect response time. Among these are the number, relative strengths, and absolute strengths of competing response tendencies. Accordingly, it was hypothesized that time to final recognition of serially presented ambiguous stimuli would be a function of the number of response alternatives available, their relative probabilities of occurrence, and their absolute strengths. Number of alternatives were varied by allowing S's to choose between two or four alternatives. Probabilities were varied by associating 3 to 1, 1 to 3, and even odds with the alternatives. Two variations of absolute strengths were induced by reinforcing or not reinforcing correct alternatives over a series of four trials preceding the critical trial. [TRUNCATED]en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.rightsBased on investigation of the BU Libraries' staff, this work is free of known copyright restrictions.en_US
dc.titleAmbiguity and response conflict: a conceptual and experimental analysisen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_US
etd.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
etd.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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