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dc.contributor.authorMorello, Thiago Fonsecaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMarchand, Sebastienen_US
dc.contributor.authorBarlow, Josen_US
dc.contributor.authorde Blas, Driss Ezzineen_US
dc.contributor.authorFerreira, Joiceen_US
dc.contributor.authorParry, Lukeen_US
dc.contributor.authorGarrett, Rachael D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGardner, Toby A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLees, Alexander C.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-16T16:52:32Z
dc.date.available2018-01-16T16:52:32Z
dc.date.issued2017-01-01
dc.identifierhttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000412944300012&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=6e74115fe3da270499c3d65c9b17d654
dc.identifier.citationRachael D Garrett, Toby A Gardner, Thiago Fonseca Morello, Sebastien Marchand, Jos Barlow, Driss Ezzine de Blas, Joice Ferreira, Alexander C Lees, Luke Parry. 2017. "Explaining the persistence of low income and environmentally degrading land uses in the Brazilian Amazon." ECOLOGY AND SOCIETY, v. 22, Issue 3, 24 p.
dc.identifier.issn1708-3087
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/26193
dc.description.abstractTropical forests continue to be plagued by the dual sustainability challenges of deforestation and rural poverty. We seek to understand why many of the farmers living in the Brazilian Amazon, home to the world’s largest tropical agricultural-forest frontier, persist in agricultural activities associated with low incomes and high environmental damage. To answer this question, we assess the factors that shape the development and distribution of agricultural activities and farmer well-being in these frontiers. Our study utilizes a uniquely comprehensive social-ecological dataset from two regions in the eastern Brazilian Amazon and employs a novel conceptual framework that highlights the interdependencies between household attributes, agricultural activities, and well-being. We find that livestock production, which yields the lowest per hectare incomes, remains the most prevalent land use in remote areas, but many examples of high income fruit, horticulture, and staple crop production exist on small properties, particularly in peri-urban areas. The transition to more profitable land uses is limited by lagging supply chain infrastructure, social preferences, and the fact that income associated with land use activities is not a primary source of perceived life quality. Instead subjective well-being is more heavily influenced by the nonmonetary attributes of a rural lifestyle (safety, tranquility, community relations, etc.). We conclude that transitions away from low-income land uses in agricultural-forest frontiers of the Brazilian Amazon need not abandon a land-focused vision of development, but will require policies and programs that identify and discriminate households based on a broader set of household assets, cultural attributes, and aspirations than are traditionally applied. At a broader scale, access to distant markets for high value crops must be improved via investments in processing, storage, and marketing infrastructure.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipWe are grateful to William C. Clark for his insightful feedback on an earlier version of this manuscript. RDG was funded by the Giorgio Ruffolo Fellowship in Sustainability Science at Harvard University and the National Science Foundation Science, Engineering, and Education for Sustainability Program (Grant #1415352) while undertaking this research. Support from Italy's Ministry for Environment, Land and Sea is gratefully acknowledged. SM was funded by the Universite d'Auvergne (FUDA). We are also grateful to the following for financial support; Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia - Biodiversidade e Uso da Terra na Amazonia (CNPq 574008/2008-0, and 400640/2012-0), Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuaria - Embrapa (SEG: 02.08.06.005.00), the UK government Darwin Initiative (17-023), The Nature Conservancy, the UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) (NE/F01614X/1 and NE/G000816/1, NE/F015356/2; NE/l018123/1; NE/K016431/1), the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) (ES/K010018/1; ES/M011542/1), the Swedish Formas 2013-1571. We also thank the farmer and worker unions of Santarem, Belterra, Mojui dos Campos, and Paragominas and all collaborating private landowners for their support. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript. (Giorgio Ruffolo Fellowship in Sustainability Science at Harvard University; 1415352 - National Science Foundation Science, Engineering, and Education for Sustainability Program; Italy's Ministry for Environment, Land and Sea; Universite d'Auvergne (FUDA); CNPq 574008/2008-0 - Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia - Biodiversidade e Uso da Terra na Amazonia; 400640/2012-0 - Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia - Biodiversidade e Uso da Terra na Amazonia; SEG: 02.08.06.005.00 - Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuaria - Embrapa; 17-023 - UK government Darwin Initiative; Nature Conservancy; NE/F01614X/1 - UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC); NE/G000816/1 - UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC); NE/F015356/2 - UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC); NE/l018123/1 - UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC); NE/K016431/1 - UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC); ES/K010018/1 - Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC); ES/M011542/1 - Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC); 2013-1571 - Swedish Formas)en_US
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherResilience Allianceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofEcology and Society
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial 4.0 Internationalen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.subjectEcologyen_US
dc.subjectScience & technologyen_US
dc.subjectLife sciences & biomedicineen_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental studiesen_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental sciences & ecologyen_US
dc.subjectCattleen_US
dc.subjectLand use transitionsen_US
dc.subjectRural developmenten_US
dc.subjectSocial capitalen_US
dc.subjectSustainable livelihoodsen_US
dc.subjectDeveloping-countriesen_US
dc.subjectConservation practicesen_US
dc.subjectSupply responseen_US
dc.subjectDeforestationen_US
dc.subjectPovertyen_US
dc.subjectLivelihoodsen_US
dc.subjectAdoptionen_US
dc.subjectModelen_US
dc.subjectDeterminantsen_US
dc.subjectMD multidisciplinaryen_US
dc.titleExplaining the persistence of low income and environmentally degrading land uses in the Brazilian Amazonen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.5751/ES-09364-220327
pubs.elements-sourceweb-of-scienceen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: No embargoen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Earth & Environmenten_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-6171-263X (Garrett, Rachael D)


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