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dc.contributor.authorMansfield, Katelyn M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCarter, Nicole M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNguyen, Lindaen_US
dc.contributor.authorCleves, Phillip A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAlshanbayeva, Anaren_US
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Leah M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCrowder, Camerronen_US
dc.contributor.authorPenvose, Ashley R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFinnerty, John R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWeis, Virginia M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSiggers, Trevor W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGilmore, Thomas D.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialEnglanden_US
dc.date2017-11-08
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-25T16:36:15Z
dc.date.available2018-01-25T16:36:15Z
dc.date.issued2017-11-22
dc.identifierhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29167511
dc.identifier.citationKatelyn M Mansfield, Nicole M Carter, Linda Nguyen, Phillip A Cleves, Anar Alshanbayeva, Leah M Williams, Camerron Crowder, Ashley R Penvose, John R Finnerty, Virginia M Weis, Trevor W Siggers, Thomas D Gilmore. 2017. "Transcription factor NF-κB is modulated by symbiotic status in a sea anemone model of cnidarian bleaching.." Sci Rep, Volume 7, Issue 1, pp. 16025.
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/26408
dc.description.abstractTranscription factor NF-κB plays a central role in immunity from fruit flies to humans, and NF-κB activity is altered in many human diseases. To investigate a role for NF-κB in immunity and disease on a broader evolutionary scale we have characterized NF-κB in a sea anemone (Exaiptasia pallida; called Aiptasia herein) model for cnidarian symbiosis and dysbiosis (i.e., "bleaching"). We show that the DNA-binding site specificity of Aiptasia NF-κB is similar to NF-κB proteins from a broad expanse of organisms. Analyses of NF-κB and IκB kinase proteins from Aiptasia suggest that non-canonical NF-κB processing is an evolutionarily ancient pathway, which can be reconstituted in human cells. In Aiptasia, NF-κB protein levels, DNA-binding activity, and tissue expression increase when loss of the algal symbiont Symbiodinium is induced by heat or chemical treatment. Kinetic analysis of NF-κB levels following loss of symbiosis show that NF-κB levels increase only after Symbiodinium is cleared. Moreover, introduction of Symbiodinium into naïve Aiptasia larvae results in a decrease in NF-κB expression. Our results suggest that Symbiodinium suppresses NF-κB in order to enable establishment of symbiosis in Aiptasia. These results are the first to demonstrate a link between changes in the conserved immune regulatory protein NF-κB and cnidarian symbiotic status.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipK22 AI093793 - NIAID NIH HHS; R01 AI116829 - NIAID NIH HHSen_US
dc.format.extentp. 16025en_US
dc.languageeng
dc.relation.ispartofSci Rep
dc.rights© The Author(s) 2017. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Cre- ative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not per- mitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectNematostella vectensisen_US
dc.subjectClimate changeen_US
dc.subjectAiptasia sp.en_US
dc.subjectProteinsen_US
dc.subjectSymbiodiniumen_US
dc.subjectMicroarraysen_US
dc.titleTranscription factor NF-κB is modulated by symbiotic status in a sea anemone model of cnidarian bleaching.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41598-017-16168-w
pubs.elements-sourcepubmeden_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: No embargoen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Biologyen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublished onlineen_US


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© The Author(s) 2017.  This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International 
License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or 
format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Cre-
ative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this 
article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the 
material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not per-
mitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the 
copyright holder.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © The Author(s) 2017. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Cre- ative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not per- mitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder.