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dc.contributor.authorPanciera, Juliaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-30T16:59:04Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/26496
dc.description.abstractCompulsive eating behavior is a transdiagnostic construct observed in certain forms of obesity and eating disorders, as well as in the recently proposed ‘food addiction.’ Compulsive eating has been conceptualized as being comprised of three elements: i) habitual overeating, ii) overeating to relieve a negative emotional state, and iii) overeating despite adverse consequences. Neurobiological processes that include maladaptive habit formation, the emergence of a negative affect, and dysfunctions in inhibitory control are thought to drive the development and persistence of compulsive eating behavior. These complex psychobehavioral processes are under the control of various neuropharmacological systems. Here, we describe the current evidence implicating these systems in compulsive eating behavior, and contextualize them within the three elements. A better understanding of the neuropharmacological substrates of compulsive eating behavior has the potential to significantly advance the pharmacotherapy for feeding-related pathologies.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectPharmacologyen_US
dc.subjectAddictionen_US
dc.subjectHabiten_US
dc.subjectWithdrawalen_US
dc.subjectCompulsive eatingen_US
dc.subjectInhibitory controlen_US
dc.titleNeuropharmacology of compulsive eatingen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.date.updated2017-11-01T01:11:40Z
dc.description.embargo2018-10-31T00:00:00Z
etd.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineMedical Sciencesen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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