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dc.contributor.authorKinrade, J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBadman, S.V.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBunce, E.J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTao, C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorProvan, G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCowley, S.W.H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGrocott, A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGray, R.L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGrodent, D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKimura, T.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNichols, J.D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorArridge, C.S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRadioti, A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorClarke, J.T.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCrary, F.J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPryor, W.R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMelin, H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBaines, K.H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDougherty, M.K.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-01T15:57:47Z
dc.date.available2018-02-01T15:57:47Z
dc.date.issued2017-06-01
dc.identifierhttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000405534800017&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=6e74115fe3da270499c3d65c9b17d654
dc.identifier.citationKinrade, J., et al. (2017), An isolated, bright cusp aurora at Saturn, J. Geophys. Res. Space Physics, 122, 6121–6138, doi:10.1002/2016JA023792.
dc.identifier.issn2169-9380
dc.identifier.issn2169-9402
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/26583
dc.description.abstractSaturn's dayside aurora displays a number of morphological features poleward of the main emission region. We present an unusual morphology captured by the Hubble Space Telescope on 14 June 2014 (day 165), where for 2 h, Saturn's FUV aurora faded almost entirely, with the exception of a distinct emission spot at high latitude. The spot remained fixed in local time between 10 and 15 LT and moved poleward to a minimum colatitude of ~4°. It was bright and persistent, displaying intensities of up to 49 kR over a lifetime of 2 h. Interestingly, the spot constituted the entirety of the northern auroral emission, with no emissions present at any other local time—including Saturn's characteristic dawn arc, the complete absence of which is rarely observed. Solar wind parameters from propagation models, together with a Cassini magnetopause crossing and solar wind encounter, indicate that Saturn's magnetosphere was likely to have been embedded in a rarefaction region, resulting in an expanded magnetosphere configuration during the interval. We infer that the spot was sustained by reconnection either poleward of the cusp or at low latitudes under a strong component of interplanetary magnetic field transverse to the solar wind flow. The subsequent poleward motion could then arise from either reconfiguration of successive open field lines across the polar cap or convection of newly opened field lines. We also consider the possible modulation of the feature by planetary period rotating current systems.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work is based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope (observation ID: GO13396), obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI), which is operated by AURA, Inc., for NASA. The Hubble observations are available from the STScI website. J. K., S. V. B., and A. G. were supported by STFC grant ST/M001059/1. S. V. B. was also supported by an STFC Ernest Rutherford Fellowship ST/M005534/1. R. L. G. was supported by an STFC studentship. E. J. B., G. P., H. M., and S. W. H. C. were supported by STFC Consolidated grant ST/N000749/1. J. D. N. was supported by STFC Advanced Fellowship ST/1004084/1. We thank the Cassini MAG team at Imperial College London for access to processed magnetometer data, which are available online from the NASA PDS PPI node, and Bill Kurth (University of Iowa) for providing a description of the RPWS observations. The OMNI data were obtained from the GSFC/SPDF OMNIWeb interface at http://omniweb. gsfc. nasa. gov, and we thank K. C. Hansen and B. Zieger for providing solar wind propagations from their Michigan Solar Wind Model (http://mswim. engin. umich. edu/). Solar wind model projections from the Tao et al. [2005] model are available on request from C. Tao. (GO13396 - NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope; obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI); ST/M001059/1 - STFC; ST/M005534/1 - STFC Ernest Rutherford Fellowship; STFC studentship; ST/N000749/1 - STFC Consolidated; ST/1004084/1 - STFC Advanced Fellowship)en_US
dc.format.extent6121 - 6138 (18)en_US
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherAMER GEOPHYSICAL UNIONen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH-SPACE PHYSICS
dc.rights©2017. The Authors. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectAstronomy & astrophysicsen_US
dc.subjectSaturnen_US
dc.subjectAuroraen_US
dc.subjectMagnetosphereen_US
dc.subjectInterplanetary magnetic fielden_US
dc.subjectHubble Space Telescopeen_US
dc.subjectPlanetary period oscillationsen_US
dc.subjectWind dynamic pressureen_US
dc.subjectPolar cuspen_US
dc.subjectMagnetopauseen_US
dc.subjectMagnetotailen_US
dc.titleAn isolated, bright cusp aurora at Saturnen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/2016JA023792
pubs.elements-sourceweb-of-scienceen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: No embargoen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Astronomyen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-8446-2645 (Clarke, JT)


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©2017. The Authors.
This is an open access article under the
terms of the Creative Commons
Attribution License, which permits use,
distribution and reproduction in any
medium, provided the original work is
properly cited.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as ©2017. The Authors. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.