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dc.contributor.authorFrazier, Patriciaen_US
dc.contributor.authorRichards, Dereken_US
dc.contributor.authorMooney, Jacquelineen_US
dc.contributor.authorHofmann, Stefan G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBeidel, Deborahen_US
dc.contributor.authorPalmieri, Patrick A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBonner, Christopheren_US
dc.coverage.spatialEnglanden_US
dc.date2016-05-14
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-01T16:49:16Z
dc.date.available2018-02-01T16:49:16Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifierhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27965847
dc.identifier.citationPatricia Frazier, Derek Richards, Jacqueline Mooney, Stefan G Hofmann, Deborah Beidel, Patrick A Palmieri, Christopher Bonner. 2016. "Acceptability and proof of concept of internet-delivered treatment for depression, anxiety, and stress in university students: protocol for an open feasibility trial.." Pilot Feasibility Stud, Volume 2:28.
dc.identifier.issn2055-5784
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/26592
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: In recent years, university counseling and mental health services have reported an increase in the number of clients seeking services and in yearly visits. This trend has been observed at many universities, indicating that behavioral and mental health issues pose significant problems for many college students. The aim of this study is to assess the acceptability and proof of concept of internet-delivered treatment for depression, anxiety, and stress for university students. METHODS/DESIGN: The study is an open feasibility trial of the SilverCloud programs for depression (Space from Depression), anxiety (Space from Anxiety), and stress (Space from Stress). All three are 8-module internet-delivered CBT (iCBT) intervention programs. Participants are assigned a supporter who provides weekly feedback on progress and exercises. Participants will complete the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD-7), and stress subscale of the Depression, Anxiety, Stress Scale-21 (DASS-21) as the outcome measures for the depression, anxiety, and stress interventions, respectively. Other outcomes include measures of acceptability of, and satisfaction, with the intervention. Data will be collected at baseline, 8 weeks and 3-month follow-up. DISCUSSION: It is anticipated that the study will inform the researchers and service personnel of the programs' potential to reduce depression, anxiety, and stress in a student population as well as the protocols to be employed in a future trial. In addition, it will provide insight into students' engagement with the programs, their user experience, and their satisfaction with the online delivery format.en_US
dc.format.extent28 - ?en_US
dc.languageeng
dc.relation.ispartofPilot Feasibility Stud
dc.rights© Frazier et al. 2016. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectAnxietyen_US
dc.subjectCBTen_US
dc.subjectDepressionen_US
dc.subjectOnline interventionsen_US
dc.subjectStressen_US
dc.subjectUniversity studentsen_US
dc.titleAcceptability and proof of concept of internet-delivered treatment for depression, anxiety, and stress in university students: protocol for an open feasibility trialen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s40814-016-0068-9
pubs.elements-sourcepubmeden_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: No embargoen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Psychological & Brain Sciencesen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublished onlineen_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-3548-9681 (Hofmann, Stefan G)


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© Frazier et al. 2016. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © Frazier et al. 2016. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.