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dc.contributor.authorManning, Joshuaen_US
dc.contributor.authorReynolds, Gretchenen_US
dc.contributor.authorSaygin, Zeynep M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHofmann, Stefan G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPollack, Marken_US
dc.contributor.authorGabrieli, John D.E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWhitfield-Gabrieli, Susanen_US
dc.coverage.spatialUnited Statesen_US
dc.date2015-03-18
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-01T16:58:16Z
dc.date.available2018-02-01T16:58:16Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifierhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25928647
dc.identifier.citationJoshua Manning, Gretchen Reynolds, Zeynep M Saygin, Stefan G Hofmann, Mark Pollack, John DE Gabrieli, Susan Whitfield-Gabrieli. 2015. "Altered resting-state functional connectivity of the frontal-striatal reward system in social anxiety disorder.." PLoS One, Volume 10, Issue 4, pp. e0125286 - ?.
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/26595
dc.description.abstractWe investigated differences in the intrinsic functional brain organization (functional connectivity) of the human reward system between healthy control participants and patients with social anxiety disorder. Functional connectivity was measured in the resting-state via functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). 53 patients with social anxiety disorder and 33 healthy control participants underwent a 6-minute resting-state fMRI scan. Functional connectivity of the reward system was analyzed by calculating whole-brain temporal correlations with a bilateral nucleus accumbens seed and a ventromedial prefrontal cortex seed. Patients with social anxiety disorder, relative to the control group, had (1) decreased functional connectivity between the nucleus accumbens seed and other regions associated with reward, including ventromedial prefrontal cortex; (2) decreased functional connectivity between the ventromedial prefrontal cortex seed and lateral prefrontal regions, including the anterior and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices; and (3) increased functional connectivity between both the nucleus accumbens seed and the ventromedial prefrontal cortex seed with more posterior brain regions, including anterior cingulate cortex. Social anxiety disorder appears to be associated with widespread differences in the functional connectivity of the reward system, including markedly decreased functional connectivity between reward regions and between reward regions and lateral prefrontal cortices, and markedly increased functional connectivity between reward regions and posterior brain regions.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipR01MH075889 - NIMH NIH HHS; R01MH078308 - NIMH NIH HHSen_US
dc.format.extente0125286 - ?en_US
dc.languageeng
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS One
dc.rights© 2015 Manning et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectVentromedial prefrontal cortexen_US
dc.subjectAnterior cingulate cortexen_US
dc.subjectHuman brainen_US
dc.subjectFMRIen_US
dc.subjectAdolescenten_US
dc.subjectAdulten_US
dc.subjectAnxiety disordersen_US
dc.subjectBrainen_US
dc.subjectFemaleen_US
dc.subjectHumansen_US
dc.subjectMagnetic resonance imagingen_US
dc.subjectMaleen_US
dc.subjectNeural pathwaysen_US
dc.subjectYoung adulten_US
dc.titleAltered resting-state functional connectivity of the frontal-striatal reward system in social anxiety disorderen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0125286
pubs.elements-sourcepubmeden_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: No embargoen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Psychological & Brain Sciencesen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublished onlineen_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-3548-9681 (Hofmann, Stefan G)


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© 2015 Manning et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2015 Manning et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.