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dc.contributor.authorMacKillop, J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFew, L. R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorStojek, M. K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, C. M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMalutinok, S. F.en_US
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, F.T.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHofmann, S. G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMcGeary, J. E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSwift, R. M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMonti, P. M.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialUnited Statesen_US
dc.date2015-02-23
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-01T17:44:51Z
dc.date.available2018-02-01T17:44:51Z
dc.date.issued2015-04-07
dc.identifierhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25849983
dc.identifier.citationJ MacKillop, LR Few, MK Stojek, CM Murphy, SF Malutinok, FT Johnson, SG Hofmann, JE McGeary, RM Swift, PM Monti. 2015. "D-cycloserine to enhance extinction of cue-elicited craving for alcohol: a translational approach.." Transl Psychiatry, Volume 5, e544.
dc.identifier.issn2158-3188
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/26596
dc.description.abstractCue-elicited craving for alcohol is well established but extinction-based treatment to extinguish this response has generated only modest positive outcomes in clinical trials. Basic and clinical research suggests that D-cycloserine (DCS) enhances extinction to fear cues under certain conditions. However, it remains unclear whether DCS would also accelerate extinction of cue-elicited craving for alcohol. The goal of the current study was to examine whether, compared with placebo (PBO), DCS enhanced extinction of cue-elicited craving among treatment-seeking individuals with alcohol use disorders (AUDs). Participants were administered DCS (50 mg) or PBO 1 h before an alcohol extinction paradigm in a simulated bar environment on two occasions. The extinction procedures occurred 1 week apart and were fully integrated into outpatient treatment. Subjective craving for alcohol was the primary variable of interest. Follow-up cue reactivity sessions were conducted 1 week and 3 weeks later to ascertain persisting DCS effects. Drinking outcomes and tolerability were also examined. DCS was associated with augmented reductions in alcohol craving to alcohol cues during the first extinction session and these effects persisted through all subsequent sessions, suggesting facilitation of extinction. Participants in the DCS condition reported significant short-term reductions in drinking, although these did not persist to follow-up, and found the medication highly tolerable. These findings provide evidence that DCS enhances extinction of cue-elicited craving for alcohol in individuals with AUDs in the context of outpatient treatment. The potential clinical utility of DCS is discussed, including methodological considerations and context-dependent learning.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipR21 AA017696 - NIAAA NIH HHS; K23 AA016936 - NIAAA NIH HHS; R21 AA017696-01A1 - NIAAA NIH HHS; T32 DA007317 - NIDA NIH HHS; T32 AR007317 - NIAMS NIH HHSen_US
dc.description.urihttp://10.0.4.14/tp.2015.41
dc.format.extentp. e544en_US
dc.languageeng
dc.relation.ispartofTransl Psychiatry
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectPsychiatryen_US
dc.subjectSocial anxiety disorderen_US
dc.subjectRandomized control trialen_US
dc.subjectObsessive-compulsive disorderen_US
dc.subjectCoupled glycine receptoren_US
dc.subjectExposure therapyen_US
dc.subjectDependent outpatientsen_US
dc.subjectFear extinctionen_US
dc.subjectAddictionen_US
dc.subjectAdulten_US
dc.subjectAgeden_US
dc.subjectAlcohol related disordersen_US
dc.subjectAntimetabolitesen_US
dc.subjectCravingen_US
dc.subjectCuesen_US
dc.subjectCycloserineen_US
dc.subjectExtinction, psychologicalen_US
dc.subjectFemaleen_US
dc.subjectFollow-up studiesen_US
dc.subjectHumansen_US
dc.subjectMaleen_US
dc.subjectMiddle ageden_US
dc.titleD-cycloserine to enhance extinction of cue-elicited craving for alcohol: a translational approach.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionPublished versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/tp.2015.41
pubs.elements-sourcepubmeden_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: No embargoen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Psychological & Brain Sciencesen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublished onlineen_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-3548-9681 (Hofmann, SG)


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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated
otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons
license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the
material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.