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dc.contributor.authorCarballo, David M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFeinman, Gary M.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialUnited Statesen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-01T19:17:07Z
dc.date.available2018-02-01T19:17:07Z
dc.date.issued2016-11
dc.identifierhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28004895
dc.identifier.citationDavid M Carballo, Gary M Feinman. 2016. "Cooperation, collective action, and the archeology of large-scale societies.." Evol Anthropol, Volume 25, Issue 6, pp. 288 - 296.
dc.identifier.issn1520-6505
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/26605
dc.description.abstractArcheologists investigating the emergence of large-scale societies in the past have renewed interest in examining the dynamics of cooperation as a means of understanding societal change and organizational variability within human groups over time. Unlike earlier approaches to these issues, which used models designated voluntaristic or managerial, contemporary research articulates more explicitly with frameworks for cooperation and collective action used in other fields, thereby facilitating empirical testing through better definition of the costs, benefits, and social mechanisms associated with success or failure in coordinated group action. Current scholarship is nevertheless bifurcated along lines of epistemology and scale, which is understandable but problematic for forging a broader, more transdisciplinary field of cooperation studies. Here, we point to some areas of potential overlap by reviewing archeological research that places the dynamics of social cooperation and competition in the foreground of the emergence of large-scale societies, which we define as those having larger populations, greater concentrations of political power, and higher degrees of social inequality. We focus on key issues involving the communal-resource management of subsistence and other economic goods, as well as the revenue flows that undergird political institutions. Drawing on archeological cases from across the globe, with greater detail from our area of expertise in Mesoamerica, we offer suggestions for strengthening analytical methods and generating more transdisciplinary research programs that address human societies across scalar and temporal spectra.en_US
dc.format.extentp. 288 - 296en_US
dc.languageeng
dc.relation.ispartofEvol Anthropol
dc.subjectAnthropologyen_US
dc.subjectSocial evolutionen_US
dc.subjectComplex societyen_US
dc.subjectCommon-pool resourcesen_US
dc.subjectPublic goodsen_US
dc.subjectMesoamericaen_US
dc.subjectComplex societiesen_US
dc.subjectPeruen_US
dc.subjectBiological evolutionen_US
dc.subjectCooperative behavioren_US
dc.subjectHumansen_US
dc.subjectInterpersonal relationsen_US
dc.subjectSocial behavioren_US
dc.subjectAnthropologyen_US
dc.subjectEvolutionary biologyen_US
dc.subjectSocial worken_US
dc.titleCooperation, collective action, and the archeology of large-scale societiesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/evan.21506
pubs.elements-sourcepubmeden_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Archaeologyen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-9546-6318 (Carballo, David M)


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