Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorHofmann, Stefan G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDoan, Stacey N.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSprung, Manuelen_US
dc.contributor.authorWilson, Anneen_US
dc.contributor.authorEbesutani, Chaden_US
dc.contributor.authorAndrews, Leigh A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCurtiss, Joshuaen_US
dc.contributor.authorHarris, Paul L.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialNetherlandsen_US
dc.date2016-01-12
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-05T16:02:18Z
dc.date.available2018-02-05T16:02:18Z
dc.date.issued2016-05
dc.identifierhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26901235
dc.identifier.citationStefan G Hofmann, Stacey N Doan, Manuel Sprung, Anne Wilson, Chad Ebesutani, Leigh A Andrews, Joshua Curtiss, Paul L Harris. 2016. "Training children's theory-of-mind: A meta-analysis of controlled studies.." Cognition, Volume 150, pp. 200 - 212.
dc.identifier.issn1873-7838
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/26670
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Theory-of-mind (ToM) refers to knowledge and awareness of mental states in oneself and others. Various training programs have been developed to improve ToM in children. OBJECTIVES: In the present study, we conducted a quantitative review of ToM training programs that have been tested in controlled studies. DATA SOURCES: A literature search was conducted using PubMed, PsycInfo, the Cochrane Library, and manual searches. REVIEW METHODS: We identified 32 papers with 45 studies or experiments that included 1529 children with an average age of 63 months (SD=28.7). RESULTS: ToM training procedures were more effective than control procedures and their aggregate effect size was moderately strong (Hedges' g=0.75, CI=0.60-0.89, p<.001). Moderator analyses revealed that although ToM training programs were generally effective, ToM skill-related outcomes increased with length of training sessions and were significantly higher in active control studies. CONCLUSION: ToM training procedures can effectively enhance ToM in children.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipR01 AT007257 - NCCIH NIH HHS; R34 MH099311 - NIMH NIH HHS; R01AT007257 - NCCIH NIH HHS; R34MH099311 - NIMH NIH HHSen_US
dc.format.extent200 - 212en_US
dc.languageeng
dc.relation.ispartofCognition
dc.subjectPsychology, experimentalen_US
dc.subjectPsychologyen_US
dc.subjectTheory of minden_US
dc.subjectTrainingen_US
dc.subjectInterventionen_US
dc.subjectMeta-analysisen_US
dc.subjectFalse beliefsen_US
dc.subjectAppearance-realityen_US
dc.subjectEmotion awareness questionnaireen_US
dc.subjectSchool age childrenen_US
dc.subjectLiteracy interventionen_US
dc.subjectPreschool childrenen_US
dc.subjectIntrusive thoughtsen_US
dc.subjectSocial competenceen_US
dc.subjectMiddle childhooden_US
dc.subjectAge factorsen_US
dc.subjectChilden_US
dc.subjectControlled clinical trialsen_US
dc.subjectHumansen_US
dc.subjectTeachingen_US
dc.subjectPsychology and cognitive sciencesen_US
dc.subjectLanguage, communication and cultureen_US
dc.subjectExperimental psychologyen_US
dc.titleTraining children's theory-of-mind: A meta-analysis of controlled studies.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.cognition.2016.01.006
pubs.elements-sourcepubmeden_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: No embargoen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Psychological & Brain Sciencesen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-3548-9681 (Hofmann, Stefan G)


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record