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dc.contributor.authorSprung, Manuelen_US
dc.contributor.authorMünch, Hannah M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHarris, Paul L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorEbesutani, Chaden_US
dc.contributor.authorHofmann, Stefan G.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialUnited Statesen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-05T16:07:23Z
dc.date.available2018-02-05T16:07:23Z
dc.date.issued2015-09-01
dc.identifierhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26405369
dc.identifier.citationManuel Sprung, Hannah M Münch, Paul L Harris, Chad Ebesutani, Stefan G Hofmann. 2015. "Children's emotion understanding: A meta-analysis of training studies.." Dev Rev, Volume 37, pp. 41 - 65.
dc.identifier.issn0273-2297
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/26671
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: In the course of development, children show increased insight and understanding of emotions-both of their own emotions and those of others. However, little is known about the efficacy of training programs aimed at improving children's understanding of emotion. OBJECTIVES: To conduct an effect size analysis of trainings aimed at three aspects of emotion understanding: external aspects (i.e., the recognition of emotional expressions, understanding external causes of emotion, understanding the influence of reminders on present emotions); mental aspects (i.e., understanding desire-based emotions, understanding belief-based emotions, understanding hidden emotions); and reflective aspects (i.e., understanding the regulation of an emotion, understanding mixed emotions, understanding moral emotions). DATA SOURCES: A literature search was conducted using PubMed, PsycInfo, the Cochrane Library, and manual searches. REVIEW METHODS: The search identified 19 studies or experiments including a total of 749 children with an average age of 86 months (S.D.=30.71) from seven different countries. RESULTS: Emotion understanding training procedures are effective for improving external (Hedge's g = 0.62), mental (Hedge's g = 0.31), and reflective (Hedge's g = 0.64) aspects of emotion understanding. These effect sizes were robust and generally unrelated to the number and lengths of training sessions, length of the training period, year of publication, and sample type. However, training setting and social setting moderated the effect of emotion understanding training on the understanding of external aspects of emotion. For the length of training session and social setting, we observed significant moderator effects of training on reflective aspects of emotion. CONCLUSION: Emotion understanding training may be a promising tool for both preventive intervention and the psychotherapeutic process. However, more well-controlled studies are needed.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipR34 MH086668 - NIMH NIH HHS; R01 AT007257 - NCCIH NIH HHS; R21 MH101567 - NIMH NIH HHS; R34 MH099311 - NIMH NIH HHS; R21 MH102646 - NIMH NIH HHS; K23 MH100259 - NIMH NIH HHS; R01 MH099021 - NIMH NIH HHSen_US
dc.format.extent41 - 65en_US
dc.languageeng
dc.relation.ispartofDev Rev
dc.subjectPsychology, developmentalen_US
dc.subjectPsychologyen_US
dc.subjectEmotion understandingen_US
dc.subjectTrainingen_US
dc.subjectMeta-analysisen_US
dc.subjectEmotion comprehensionen_US
dc.subjectEmotional competencyen_US
dc.subjectInterventionen_US
dc.subjectTraining studiesen_US
dc.subjectTest of Emotion Comprehensionen_US
dc.subjectTheory of minden_US
dc.subjectHigh functioning childrenen_US
dc.subjectLiteracy interventionen_US
dc.subjectSocial competenceen_US
dc.subjectYoung childrenen_US
dc.subjectAutismen_US
dc.subjectAdolescentsen_US
dc.subjectCognitive scienceen_US
dc.subjectDevelopmental & child psychologyen_US
dc.titleChildren's emotion understanding: A meta-analysis of training studies.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.dr.2015.05.001
pubs.elements-sourcepubmeden_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: No embargoen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Psychological & Brain Sciencesen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-3548-9681 (Hofmann, Stefan G)


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