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dc.contributor.authorWu, Jade Q.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSzpunar, Karl K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGodovich, Sheina A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSchacter, Daniel L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHofmann, Stefan G.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialNetherlandsen_US
dc.date2015-09-11
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-05T16:41:06Z
dc.date.available2018-02-05T16:41:06Z
dc.date.issued2015-12
dc.identifierhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26398003
dc.identifier.citationJade Q Wu, Karl K Szpunar, Sheina A Godovich, Daniel L Schacter, Stefan G Hofmann. 2015. "Episodic future thinking in generalized anxiety disorder.." J Anxiety Disord, Volume 36, pp. 1 - 8.
dc.identifier.issn1873-7897
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/26679
dc.description.abstractResearch on future-oriented cognition in generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) has primarily focused on worry, while less is known about the role of episodic future thinking (EFT), an imagery-based cognitive process. To characterize EFT in this disorder, we used the experimental recombination procedure, in which 21 GAD and 19 healthy participants simulated positive, neutral and negative novel future events either once or repeatedly, and rated their phenomenological experience of EFT. Results showed that healthy controls spontaneously generated more detailed EFT over repeated simulations. Both groups found EFT easier to generate after repeated simulations, except when GAD participants simulated positive events. They also perceived higher plausibility of negative-not positive or neutral-future events than did controls. These results demonstrate a negativity bias in GAD individuals' episodic future cognition, and suggest their relative deficit in generating vivid EFT. We discuss implications for the theory and treatment of GAD.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipR01 MH060941 - NIMH NIH HHS; R01 MH078308 - NIMH NIH HHS; R01AG08441 - NIA NIH HHS; R01 AT007257 - NCCIH NIH HHS; R01MH60941 - NIMH NIH HHS; R01 AG008441 - NIA NIH HHS; R34 MH099311 - NIMH NIH HHS; R21MH102646 - NIMH NIH HHS; R01AT007257 - NCCIH NIH HHS; R21 MH102646 - NIMH NIH HHS; R34MH078308 - NIMH NIH HHSen_US
dc.format.extent1 - 8en_US
dc.languageeng
dc.relation.ispartofJ Anxiety Disord
dc.subjectSocial sciencesen_US
dc.subjectLife sciences & biomedicineen_US
dc.subjectPsychology, clinicalen_US
dc.subjectPsychiatryen_US
dc.subjectPsychologyen_US
dc.subjectGeneralized anxiety disorderen_US
dc.subjectEpisodic future thinkingen_US
dc.subjectEmotionen_US
dc.subjectCognitionen_US
dc.subjectPhobic imageryen_US
dc.subjectDepressionen_US
dc.subjectAdolescenten_US
dc.subjectAdulten_US
dc.subjectAnalysis of varianceen_US
dc.subjectAnxiety disordersen_US
dc.subjectCase-control studiesen_US
dc.subjectFemaleen_US
dc.subjectForecastingen_US
dc.subjectHumansen_US
dc.subjectMaleen_US
dc.subjectMiddle ageden_US
dc.subjectPerceptionen_US
dc.subjectThinkingen_US
dc.subjectYoung adulten_US
dc.subjectHumansen_US
dc.subjectClinical sciencesen_US
dc.subjectClinical psychologyen_US
dc.titleEpisodic future thinking in generalized anxiety disorderen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.janxdis.2015.09.005
pubs.elements-sourcepubmeden_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: No embargoen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Psychological & Brain Sciencesen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-3548-9681 (Hofmann, Stefan G)


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