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dc.contributor.authorFauchald, Peren_US
dc.contributor.authorPark, Taejinen_US
dc.contributor.authorTømmervik, Hansen_US
dc.contributor.authorMyneni, Rangaen_US
dc.contributor.authorHausner, Vera Heleneen_US
dc.coverage.spatialUnited Statesen_US
dc.date2017-03-01
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-05T19:09:59Z
dc.date.available2018-02-05T19:09:59Z
dc.date.issued2017-04
dc.identifierhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28508037
dc.identifier.citationPer Fauchald, Taejin Park, Hans Tømmervik, Ranga Myneni, Vera Helene Hausner. 2017. "Arctic greening from warming promotes declines in caribou populations.." Sci Adv, Volume 3, Issue 4: e1601365.
dc.identifier.issn2375-2548
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/26696
dc.description.abstractThe migratory tundra caribou herds in North America follow decadal population cycles, and browsing from abundant caribou could be expected to counteract the current climate-driven expansion of shrubs in the circumpolar tundra biome. We demonstrate that the sea ice cover in the Arctic Ocean has provided a strong signal for climate-induced changes on the adjacent caribou summer ranges, outperforming other climate indices in explaining the caribou-plant dynamics. We found no evidence of a negative effect of caribou abundance on vegetation biomass. On the contrary, we found a strong bottom-up effect in which a warmer climate related to diminishing sea ice has increased the plant biomass on the summer pastures, along with a paradoxical decline in caribou populations. This result suggests that this climate-induced greening has been accompanied by a deterioration of pasture quality. The shrub expansion in Arctic North America involves plant species with strong antibrowsing defenses. Our results might therefore be an early signal of a climate-driven shift in the caribou-plant interaction from a system with low plant biomass modulated by cyclic caribou populations to a system dominated by nonedible shrubs and diminishing herds of migratory caribou.en_US
dc.format.extente1601365 - ?en_US
dc.languageeng
dc.relation.ispartofSci Adv
dc.rights2017 © The Authors, some rights reserved. Distributed under a Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial License 4.0 (CC BY-NC).en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.subjectScience & technologyen_US
dc.subjectMultidisciplinary sciencesen_US
dc.subjectTundra vegetation changeen_US
dc.subjectSea-ice declineen_US
dc.subjectTime seriesen_US
dc.subjectPlant phenologyen_US
dc.subjectHerbivoresen_US
dc.subjectClimateen_US
dc.subjectArctic sea iceen_US
dc.subjectClimate changeen_US
dc.subjectNormalized Difference Vegetation Indexen_US
dc.subjectRangifer tarandusen_US
dc.subjectPopulation dynamicsen_US
dc.subjectCaribouen_US
dc.titleArctic greening from warming promotes declines in caribou populationsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1126/sciadv.1601365
pubs.elements-sourcepubmeden_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: No embargoen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Earth & Environmenten_US
pubs.publication-statusPublished onlineen_US
dc.date.online2017-04-26
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-0234-6393 (Myneni, Ranga)


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2017 © The Authors, some rights reserved. Distributed under a Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial License 4.0 (CC BY-NC).
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as 2017 © The Authors, some rights reserved. Distributed under a Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial License 4.0 (CC BY-NC).